In this issue, Nov. 15-21

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Worcester contractor turns couple’s dream into nightmare |  While the dream of home ownership is often fraught with wake-up calls, the fact that a soon-to-be Charlton couple has waited more than a year to move into its new home is merely the tip of the iceberg when it comes to how they say Mutual Builders has turned their experience into a veritable nightmare. Patrick Sargent begins to explore this construction morass.

There are several steps left before Mutual Builders is finished with Jesse Messier's new home ... more than a year after it was supposed to be finished.

Courtesy Jesse Messier

There are several steps left before Mutual Builders is finished with Jesse Messier’s new home … more than a year after it was supposed to be finished.


Part 4: The Smoldering Bitterness of Enemies |  “Finally, we got close to Bwiam, where I was posted. It was also the hometown of the education secretary. Close to the town, I said to myself that there was a motive for transferring me to his hometown. Maybe that is where he could ask his boys to torture me or maltreat me.” Maybe it was. Only one way to find out what happens next in the unbelievably true story of Augustine Kanjia. Don’t miss the fourth installment.

Augustine Kanjia

Courtesy of Augustine Kanjia

Augustine Kanjia at his home in Bwiam

To catch up on the continuing series, follow these links:

Introducing the unbelievably true story of Augustine Kanjia
Part 1: The Decision That Saved My Life
Part 2: The Struggle for Survival in a Strange Land
Part 3: Good luck, bad luck, who knows?


Editorial: Protest tactics speak for themselves |  Last week the case against four Black Lives Matter protesters charged with disturbing the peace was delayed until January. By then it will have been nearly a year since the protest shut down Kelley Square for four and a half minutes. We look at the case, compare it with a lesser-known protest that played out over eight months, and we ask the question “Who is better serving their cause?”


Sun Spots with Hitch: Vol. 6 |  As Worcester continues to stand with the popular crowd in its expanded initiative to snuff out smoking wherever it can, the city’s efforts in a more divisive regulatory arena were recently kicked to the curb. Will it be back to the drawing board? Well, we know one guy who’ll be there …


Green Hill Park, the city's largest, comprises more than 480 acres, including the state's Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Green Hill Park, the city’s largest, comprises more than 480 acres, including the state’s Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Second Thought: A new model for Worcester’s parks |  The Worcester Regional Research Bureau released a paper that raised questions about whether the city’s parks could be managed by a conservancy, a nonprofit agency that would raise funds and manage and maintain the parks. While there is a lot to like about this approach, the devil is in the details.


Local Business Spotlight: Lock 50 aims to raise level of Canal District cuisine |  With more than 15 years of cooking experience, most recently at Shrewsbury Street’s Volturno, Tim Russo — Worcester’s Best Chef 2015 — has honed his skills. Now, he and business partner Tom Studer are charting a new course for themselves and the Water Street culinary scene with their coming-soon contemporary American restaurant.

Chef Tim Russo, left, and general manager Tom Studer plan to bring a distinct style to the Canal District culinary scene.

Giselle Rivera-Flores / For Worcester Sun

Chef Tim Russo, left, and general manager Tom Studer plan to bring a distinct style to the Canal District culinary scene.


Green Street has a Hangover … and a Spot … coming on |  The main artery between Kelley Square and downtown is nothing if not ever-evolving. (Unless you serve Dive Shots, then you’ll never close.) No surprise then that some industry veterans are planning a pair of new drinking, eating and entertainment establishments for a winter debut. Patrick Sargent has the 411.


Worcesternomics: Give back and get back |  To help community development corporations raise private funds the Commonwealth in 2012 created the Community Investment Tax Credit, which pays you back 50 percent of eligible charitable donations. Here, we’ll show you which CDCs in the city benefit, and take a look at the best and easiest-to-understand tax credit you’ve never heard of.


Worcester Weekly |  Where else can you get Tom Hanks, ‘80s rock duo Wham! and Mr. Olympia all in one? Nowhere else. That’s where. Mix in a handful of insight-filled, business-themed workshops and finish with a sprinkle of grassroots creative class entrepreneurship, and you’ve got one heckuva lineup (that’s not even counting the basketball and 5k). Dig in to the best places to go and things to do this week.


New in our Free to Read section:

Sun Shine: Seven Hills jobs program up and running |  How easy it can be to take employment for granted — even today — and to minimize all those things we forget we take home with us for the weekend besides the paycheck, like a sense of accomplishment, camaraderie and an evolving skill set. We know where you might find a few people who have a very different idea about what it means to have a job.

Brothers Andrew, left, and Nicholas Norton teamed up to open their second West Boylston Street eatery, Wicked Wing Co. (they are franchisees of Wild Willy's Burgers since 2012).

Giselle Rivera-Flores / For Worcester Sun

Brothers Andrew, left, and Nicholas Norton teamed up to open their second West Boylston Street eatery, Wicked Wing Co. (they are franchisees of Wild Willy’s Burgers since 2012).

Local Business Spotlight: Wicked Wing Co. |  Ever try closing for an opening act? The restaurant game is a fickle animal in any environment, so why not try what the Norton boys of Wicked Wing Co. pulled off in early September, when the eatery’s friends-and-family debut was so successful that the wings joint had to skip a day to retrench for its public launch. Find out why they’ve been busy ever since.

Giselle Rivera-Flores and her daughter, Brooklyn

Courtesy Giselle Rivera-Flores

Giselle Rivera-Flores and her daughter, Brooklyn

Sun Serial: A Mother’s Journey | Part 1 — The Brooklyn trip |  “I started to feel as if I failed my daughter. The help was there but I was unable to provide it due to financial constraints. It was another sleepless night for me as I paced my home, searching … How can a parent provide a better education for their children in the city of Worcester with limited options for additional help and resources?” In this story from Sept. 20, we started out, destination unclear, with Sun contributor Giselle Rivera-Flores as she embarked on an ambitious quest to not only provide for her daughter but offer answers for families like hers.

Finally, if you haven’t yet signed up to receive our email newsletter, do it today. The Worcester Sun will make a special announcement this week that you will want to to be the first to see.  

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