In this issue, Jan. 24-30

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Charlene Dumais, right, with Paws for the Cause director Melissa Dudley.

Courtesy Paws for the Cause

Charlene Dumais, right, with Paws for the Cause director Melissa Dudley.

Sun Shine: Charlene’s cause |  A local woman’s lifelong love for animals still inspires an organization that helps people facing cancer. Over the past two years, with the proceeds raised from the Fur Ball and other efforts, Paws for the Cause has donated nearly $45,000 to women battling breast cancer and their families. Patrick Sargent reports on Charlene Dumais and the spirit she left behind.


Can you make your way out of this room? It won't be as easy as opening the door.

Patrick Sargent / For Worcester Sun

Can you make your way out of this room? It won’t be as easy as opening the door.

Local Business Spotlight: Escape Games |  Need an escape? Have an hour? A new venture in Worcester challenges groups to think their way out of a room filled with clues and dead ends. Patrick Sargent looks at Escape Games Worcester, something different in the local nightlife scene.


Alfredo Garcia, head chef, and Mirna Cazares, co-owner, of El Patron Mexican restaurant.

Giselle Rivera-Flores / For Worcester Sun

Alfredo Garcia, head chef, and Mirna Cazares, co-owner, of El Patron Mexican restaurant.

Hidden Gem: El Patron Mexican restaurant |  Mexican flavors cooked by expert hands have had hungry people lining up on Harding Street for nearly a year. Giselle Rivera-Flores rolls into El Patron and dishes on a place that leaves you asking for mas.


Sina-cism: Those solar farm blues |  A Millbury decision has brought the trend to Worcester’s doorstep. The proposed facility will cover 4.5 acres and is already rankling the sensibilities of folks in the Flint Pond Village. The good news: If you do the math, there is little chance these expensive and divisive projects will become mainstream. Sometimes, kids, saving the planet just doesn’t add up.

Topaz Solar Farm in Southern California

Wikimedia Commons

Topaz Solar Farm in Southern California


Editorial: Worcester Housing Authority’s A Better Life program is  working |  The latest data released by WHA shows the program continues to put residents on a path to self-sufficiency. The work and training requirements once decried by critics is placing people in jobs, increasing income and savings, and reducing debt. We look at what has made outgoing Executive Director Raymond V. Mariano’s signature program so successful and why the results achieved in Worcester may not be matched elsewhere.


Sun Spots with Hitch [Vol. 26]: Up in smoke |  State Sen. Michael O. Moore was part of a recent legislative fact-finding mission to Colorado to weigh the pros and cons of legalizing recreational marijuana use. The delegation came back, to be sure, with vital perspective, but Moore was quick to point out the lack of definitive conclusions. It’s like they just want to keep us confused, man. Puff, puff, Hitch.

From last Wednesday: Sen Moore: Reflections on marijuana expedition to Colorado


Sarah Valente, left, and Nicole Landry are Holy Cross seniors leading the Magafan Mural Project at Worcester East Middle School.

Giselle Rivera-Flores / For Worcester Sun

Sarah Valente, left, and Nicole Landry are Holy Cross seniors leading the Magafan Mural Project at Worcester East Middle School.

Up Next: Arts Council taps East Middle, Palladium projects for awards |  The Worcester Arts Council has recognized numerous artistic projects in the city with grants, including $5,000 to boost an effort to restore four beautiful and historical murals inside Worcester East Middle School. The 2016 grant recipients will be formally announced at Tuesday’s City Council meeting.


Sun Serial: A Mother’s Journey | Part 11 — The imperfect storm |  The great Ralph Waldo Emerson once said, “Bad times have a scientific value. These are occasions a good learner would not miss.” Preach Emerson! … It has been a challenging run of circumstances for Giselle Rivera-Flores and The Learning Hub tutoring center, but lessons are indeed in full swing.


Wachusett basketball star Mya Mosley stands with her parents, Will Mosley of Worcester and Donna Gillogly, who captained the team at Worcester State.

Ken Powers / For Worcester Sun

Wachusett basketball star Mya Mosley stands with her parents, Will Mosley of Worcester and Donna Gillogly, who captained the team at Worcester State.

The Score with Ken Powers: Mosley courts success, own legacy |  Mya Mosley could have taken up just about anything and excelled — she’s one of those kids. But with a father who starred on the hardwood at Burncoat and a mom who captained the Worcester State team, she was a natural on the basketball court. KP takes a closer look at the Wachusett Regional star, highlights some city standouts and more.


Worcester Weekly: Six things to do, Jan. 24-30 |  Let’s see. … Well, there appears to be quite a lot to do this week. You’ve got your midweek sports fix. A fascinating lecture. Cars and trucks and motorcycles. Oh boy. Don’t want to give it all away, though, so get on in there and fill up your smartphone’s calendar with goodness.


New in Free to Read

Worcestory Lesson: Worcester Gas Light Co., impact and legacy

The development of a gas system in the city is similar to building out broadband Internet access today, or the telephone system in the early 20th century. A complete system was seen as a mark of progress and advancement. In an era long before the environmental movement or even electricity, the byproducts of this process were not understood in the same way that we know them today.

Community Servings volunteers work on food preparation. Volunteers are also needed for delivering meals to homebound individuals.

Courtesy Community Servings

Community Servings volunteers work on food preparation. Volunteers are also needed for delivering meals to homebound individuals.

Sun Shine: Much-needed help on the menu at Community Servings

As the operation continues to grow in Worcester, Community Servings nonprofit meal delivery service has found that individuals, businesses and other organizations are more than willing to do their part to make sure homebound residents get the meals they need.

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