Sun Shine: ACE makes the grade for Worcester refugee students

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African Community Education (ACE) is a Worcester program founded a decade ago to help the many children in need who came from all over Africa, due to war or sickness, as refugees with their parents to resettle in the area.

Many of these kids come from non-English-speaking countries, and even many of those who’ve arrived from places where English was spoken could not manage to learn due to poverty and/or life in refugee camps.

Kaska Yawo understood, then, that something must be done.

ACE was founded by Yawo and Olga Valdman in 2006 when refugees from Somalia, Liberia and other African countries were on the rise in the area. Yawo, ACE’s executive director, had arrived from Liberia as a refugee in 1998 and knew the problems they all faced.

Kaska Yawo speaks at a Social Innovation Forum event.

Courtesy ACE

Kaska Yawo speaks at a Social Innovation Forum event.

“As a refugee myself I had challenges; due to culture it was hard for me. Even coming with a college degree it was difficult,” he said. “One has to recertify before it would work for you. I had to relocate from New York to Worcester to live in my cousin’s house, who had joined the military. I had various jobs until I got a job with the Catholic Charities in the resettlement area.”


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