Worcester Sun, June 22: In this issue

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Rainbow Readers offers new chapter for Worcester LGBT community |  “Back in November, I was frustrated because I knew of book clubs nearby, but none that interested me. So I decided I might as well start my own.” Sarah Slocum said she discovered the closest LGBT book club was in an Arlington library some 50 miles away. Now, though, folks like Sarah only have to make their way to James Street. New Sun contributor Danielle Cutillo takes a closer look at one of the city’s newest LGBT resources.

Sarah Slocum, creator of Rainbow Readers, a new LGBT book group with sessions for young and adult readers.

Danielle Cutillo / For Worcester Sun

Sarah Slocum, creator of Rainbow Readers, a new LGBT book group with sessions for young and adult readers.


Come back Sunday to check out Worcester Sun’s next edition, when we profile another unique and impactful resource for the Worcester-area LGBT community.


Editorial: Who’s the fairest of them all? | Worcester’s affordability is a key selling point in recruiting and keeping young professionals who will help create a vibrant 21st century economy. A study released last Thursday, though, views the city and region through a different lens, one that resonates with millennials. What is it that makes Worcester the best large city in the Northeast in which to live? We tell you.


June22SunSpot_teaseSun Spots with Hitch [Vol. 69]: Asian long-horned beetles, an appreciation |  Worcester’s reservoir capacity was about 81 percent June 18, according to the city website. That’s a solid B-minus, but nowhere close to making the grade: on average, the city’s water supply is about 99 percent this time of year and hasn’t been this low in June since 1966. So, on the list of summer annoyances in the city, the much-maligned Asian long-horned beetle might just be moving down the list. Hitch thirsts for answers on this gnawing subject.


Senate President Stanley M. Rosenberg and House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo

Sam Doran (SHNS / file photo)

Senate President Stanley M. Rosenberg and House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo

Senate president says ‘quite a bit’ may need to be cut from state budget |  Stanley Rosenberg suggested the budgets produced this year by the House and Senate, both totaling roughly $39.5 billion, may require substantial adjustment to their bottom lines. The plan to address the $750 million gap before July 1 so far can best be characterized by what leaders hope to protect, rather than where they plan to cut. State House News Service reports from Beacon Hill.


Inbox [June 22]: Out to Lunch starts tomorrow, Greater Worcester Opera to perform, Seven Hill Charter wins video award, WCAC announces new hires |  Interesting and worthwhile things happen every day in our community. Alas, we can’t cover them all. That’s where Inbox comes in, to offer readers an easily digestible compilation of interesting and noteworthy items you and your neighbors keep telling us about. Have a release or a photo you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.


New in Free to Read

Michael and Coreen Gaffney

Mark A. Henderson / Worcester Sun

Councilor at-large Mike Gaffney and his wife, Coreen.

Mike Gaffney, a Q&A with Worcester’s ‘People’s Councilor®’
Million-dollar lawsuits and luncheons with governors, mudslinging, Main South and making waves on the radio. You could say there’s a lot to talk about with Michael T. Gaffney. The ambitious counselor shared his thoughts with Patrick Sargent on Gordon Davis, City Manager Edward M. Augustus Jr., future plans for higher office, moving to Beacon Street and trading in home improvement for politics.

Melinda Taylor, longtime manager, and Cassie Ramsey, the new chef, hope to keep the regulars coming back to the new Grill on the Hill.

Patrick Sargent / For Worcester Sun

Melinda Taylor, longtime manager, and Cassie Ramsey, the new chef, hope to keep the regulars coming back to the new Grill on the Hill.

Local Business Spotlight: Grill on the Hill drives for green
“It’s like family up here to me. There’s great potential in this place.” When Melinda Taylor and her husband Jim, both industry veterans, had a chance to take over Grill on the Hill, where business had declined since its late 2011 open, they jumped. Now Green Hill Golf Course’s bar and restaurant has reopened under new management, with a new chef and more changes coming — but you can still order up a Guinness burger, a beer and a sunset.

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