Editorial: More powerful than guns: Talk, training, respect

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When shots shattered the peace of a just-concluded protest rally Thursday night, a Dallas police officer pushed a man away from harm.

Of course, that kind of quick, life-saving competence happened many times over — not just to the bystander whose story lasts but half a sentence in a long and gripping Washington Post report.

That’s what police officers do. Something bad happens, or unusual or suspicious, and police training jumps in like instinct.

In Worcester, in Texas and throughout the nation, police officers are saving lives and ready to rush to risky situations.

Gov. Charlie Baker was busy Friday, here pausing with House Speaker Robert DeLeo and Boston Mayor Marty Walsh for a moment of silence to honor the victims of this week's shooting tragedies in Texas, Minnesota and Louisiana.

Antonio Caban / State House News Service

Gov. Charlie Baker was busy Friday, here pausing with House Speaker Robert DeLeo and Boston Mayor Marty Walsh for a moment of silence to honor the victims of this week’s shooting tragedies in Texas, Minnesota and Louisiana.

We’re fortunate to have the protection of these capable, armed, alert men and women in uniform. We’re blessed to live in a country where people can gather in mass protests against serious lapses in police conduct, and still have police there to protect them and our system.


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