State invests millions to close gap between shelter and services for homeless

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BOSTON — With an investment of more than $90 million announced Monday, Aug. 15, the state is attempting to disrupt the cycle of poverty and homelessness by generating affordable rental housing units and connecting residents of some of those units to social service providers.

The funding from the Department of Housing and Community Development — more than $31 million in state and federal tax credits, and more than $59 million in subsidies to 26 housing projects across Massachusetts — is expected to generate more than $230 million in private investment, Gov. Charlie Baker said, and will produce or preserve 1,420 rental units, with 1,334 of them designated as affordable housing. The state investments will be made in 16 communities around the state.

In Worcester, according to the state press release, the Union Hill Rental Housing Initiative II is a preservation project sponsored by Oak Hill Community Development Corporation. The project will offer 24 rehabilitated housing units affordable to households earning less than 60 percent of area median income, with five units reserved for households earning less than 30 percent of that threshold.

Gov. Charlie Baker jokingly interrupted Sheila Dillon (center), director of the Department of Neighborhood Development for Boston, during her remarks celebrating a rental housing award announcement after she teased that funding "hasn't come in yet" for the next phase of redevelopment of 48 Boylston St.

Antonio Caban / State House News Service

Gov. Charlie Baker jokingly interrupted Sheila Dillon (center), director of the Department of Neighborhood Development for Boston, during her remarks celebrating a rental housing award announcement after she teased that funding “hasn’t come in yet” for the next phase of redevelopment of 48 Boylston St.

“We’re building more inclusive communities, providing pathways to better economic and social opportunities for working families, individuals and our most vulnerable to reach stability and end cycles of generational poverty and homelessness,” Baker said Monday afternoon at an announcement event at 48 Boylston St. in Boston.


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