November 27, 2016

On Beacon Hill: Hundreds of Worcester students languish on waitlist as report calls for $27M to fill vocational education spending gap

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Flickr / Alberto G.

Worcester Public Schools continue to make the grade when it comes to graduation and dropout rates.

From State House News Service

ON THE AGENDA

  • As vocational education demand rises, officials, including Tim Murray, grapple with prohibitive cost
  • Video: DiMasi released after prison sentence for corruption
  • State public colleges seek $40M spending spike
DiMasi speaks to assembled media at Logan Airport after five years in federal prison.

Sam Doran / State House News Service

DiMasi speaks to assembled media at Logan Airport after five years in federal prison.


TOP OF THE HILL

Report calls for $27M to fill vocational education spending gap; 500 Worcester students wait

It would cost at least an additional $27 million per year to fulfill the unmet demand for high school vocational education programs across Massachusetts, programs that advocates say are critical to meeting the labor demands of businesses in the state, according to a report released Friday.

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, in a paper titled “Skills For Our Future,” reported that while a career, vocational and technical education (CVTE) costs about $5,000 per pupil more than a traditional high school education each year, good CVTE programs can boost college attendance and career earning power.

“The high performance of Massachusetts’ economy is due largely to our highly skilled and well-educated workforce,” Noah Berger, president of MassBudget, said. “Well-designed vocational education programs can provide students with high quality academic and vocational education, including hands-on learning, to prepare those students for fulfilling lives and careers.”


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