February 19, 2017

Sina-cism: Oh, but it’s for the children, after all

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A recent story leaves no doubt that the schools are starved for funds, a complaint which has been voiced by urban public schools for about the last 50 years.
Chris Sinacola

Chris Sinacola

According to a report in last week’s Telegram & Gazette, Worcester Superintendent of Schools Maureen Binienda is spending about one-fifth of her time pursuing private funds to bolster the city’s public school budget.

As the story puts it:

“From the development of a district strategic plan to pencils for the PSAT, Ms. Binienda has sought the help of local businesses and groups to provide what her system’s own slim budget can’t …”

It’s not clear who’s calling the WPS budget slim, but the story leaves no doubt that the schools are starved for funds, a complaint which has been voiced by urban public schools for about the last 50 years, ever since post-World War II America ran into the financial realities of financing the Great Society welfare state.

Before we examine the finances, one general observation: While advocates for district public schools object vociferously to every dollar “drained” by public charter schools — which, in their illogic, amounts to the “privatization” of public education — no one seems to mind when public schools pursue actual private funding.

Not that I blame Binienda for seeking more money. Most organizations prefer more money to less, and the stuff does come in handy.


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