Worcester Weekly: AbilityFest, Holy Cross football + more, Oct. 1-7

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too.

Sunday, Oct. 1 — AbilityFest 2017, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Institute Park, Salisbury Street, between Park and Humboldt Avenues  For more than six decades, the Seven Hills Foundation has helped people from all walks of life “See, Believe and Achieve,” no matter their myriad challenges. And for the third year running, they will highlight that message with a 5K road race and the Murphy Mile Walk (registration is closed).

Wikimedia Commons

Institute Park is set to host the third annual Seven Hills Foundation AbilityFest.

What you’ll be going for are the family-fun activities, exhibitors, vendors and live music from Worcester’s own My Silent Bravery — and to support the tremendous work of Seven Hills and the remarkable achievements of the folks they support. Free and open to the public.

POW! WOW! Worcester, a photo essay [Part 2]

Don’t have time for a leisurely stroll around the whole 38 square miles of the city to see the more than 40 murals left behind by the talented artists who participated in the second annual event?

The Worcester Sun, in partnership with @igworcesterma and Jaime Flores Photography (check out their website here), has you covered. And check back with the Sun in the next couple of editions to see the city’s newest works of art through the unique perspective of Jaime and friends.

Check out Part 1 from last Sunday

Pastor Judith Hanlon

Inbox [Sept. 24-30]: News and notes from Worcester State, Becker, city, WPI, LGBT Asylum Task Force

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

Worcester State raises nearly $17M in Change Lives campaign

Worcester State University announced it has raised $16.9 million through the recently completed Change Lives Campaign, exceeding its $15 million goal.

WSU President Barry Maloney thanked donors for their support of scholarships, academic programs and transformational capital projects during a Gala of Gratitude celebration last night [Saturday, Sept. 23] in the school’s recently opened Wellness Center.

More than 7,000 donors contributed to the success of this five-year campaign, which is the third and largest in the Worcester State Foundation’s history.

POW! WOW! Worcester, a photo essay [Part 1]

Don’t have time for a leisurely stroll around the whole 38 square miles of the city to see the more than 40 murals left behind by the talented artists who participated in the second annual event?

The Worcester Sun, in partnership with @igworcesterma and Jaime Flores Photography (check out their website here), has you covered. And check back with the Sun in the next couple of editions to see the city’s newest works of art through the unique perspective of Jaime and friends.

Worcester Weekly: stART on the Street, Clustertruck + more, Sept. 17-23

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too.

Sunday, Sept. 17 — stART on the Street, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Park Avenue, between Highland and Pleasant streets  If you’re going to bring gridlock to the heart of the city, you might as well do it with hundreds of talented artists, crafters and performers, and a list of activities longer than the backup on Chandler Street. That’s the great thing about stART on the Street — with so many cool things to see and do, for once nobody’s worried about the traffic.

Songs in the key of healing: Worcester Center for Expressive Therapies offers hope

Older patients who had suffered a stroke had lost the ability to speak, but would still be able to sing. Patients who have been unable to walk have found their stride with the assistance of the center’s music therapy. These stories aren’t as improbable as they seem. “Music activates both sides of the brain,” said Kayla Daly, owner/director. “Music can re-create new neural connections in the brain.”

Inbox [Sept. 13]: News and notes from The Grid, WPI, Bancroft School, Women in Action, Davis Art Gallery and City to Saddle

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

MG2 Group secures $38M for Grid properties

The MG2 Group, owners of the Grid District, have secured a $38 million floating-rate loan for Bancroft on the Grid and Portland on the Grid, two adjacent multifamily properties with commercial space along Worcester Common.

The loan will facilitate the assets’ transition to luxury apartments amid Worcester’s revitalization and provide necessary capital to build out two high-end restaurant spaces at ground level.

“John McGrail and MG2 have been pioneers in Worcester dating back more than a decade, and Ladder Capital took the time to understand just how much is going on in the local market,” Tom Sullivan, executive director of Cushman & Wakefield’s Boston debt practice, said. “This loan will allow MG2 to fulfill the vision it has had for these assets and turn them into two of Worcester’s premier housing and entertainment destinations.”

The Muse is inspired to remain a part of Worcester’s downtown revival

Upon opening its doors two years ago, The Muse, 536 Main St., across the street from Hanover Theatre for the Performing Arts, intended to build upon the momentum of the city’s revitalization plans.

Coming to Federal Square during the much-ballyhooed “downtown renaissance,” The Muse owners John Rinaldo and Matt Kingman set forth to be a part of the bigger picture. Cultivating a brand based on the anticipated vibes of new visitors and returning friends with hip cocktails and craft beer, The Muse has added something flagrantly unique to the urban lifestyle trend in Worcester.

Coupled with its tight embrace of the city’s flourishing arts scene, The Muse quickly set itself apart from the typical Worcester bar.

With more than 30 years of hospitality experience and a hearty helping of inspiration from other forward-thinking business owners like Alec Lopez, owner of Armsby Abbey and The Dive, Rinaldo saw Worcester for what it truly is: a blank canvas.

Painting frames pathway to healing: Local artist Campion seeks to end silence of sexual assault

“Love who you are,” a painting by Jane M. Campion, who is a young, vibrant professional and practicing artist, inspires survivors of sexual assault, according to the painting’s owner, Quiana Langley-Carr, who keeps it prominently displayed on her office wall at Pathways for Change Inc.

A couple of years ago, Jane was showing some of her paintings at Electric Haze, a Green Island bar and live music venue. Jane always believed she was meant to reach out and help others through her art, but little did she know that selling this painting to Langley-Carr, who is Pathways’ hotline and volunteer coordinator, would be the catalyst for a new future.

Courtesy Jane M. Campion

“Love who you are,” by Jane M. Campion

Jane remembers having several childhood friends who went through a lot of trauma, and she was sometimes even a witness to those events. She says what a lot of people don’t realize is that, when we hurt, our family hurts and our friends hurt. In college, Jane became a women’s studies and multicultural studies major.

Worcester Weekly: Holy Cross football, preliminary election + more, Sept. 10-16

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too.

Monday, Sept. 11 — Lecture: Government’s Role in Segregation, 4:30 p.m., Rehm Library, Smith Hall, College of the Holy Cross, 1 College St.  “Racial segregation characterizes every metropolitan area in the [United States] and bears responsibility for our most serious social and economic problems.” This is the crux of the argument author Richard Rothstein will discuss, based on his 2017 book “The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America.”

A fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund who has written a number of books on race, education and social equality, Rothstein said segregation — more specifically, how it happened — is no mystery; it was forged from the policies (“racially explicit and unconstitutional”) and politics of the mid-20th century. And it will linger until we learn from this history. Free and open to the public.