Worcester Weekly: Oktoberfest, Worcester State football + more, Sept. 24-30

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too.

Tuesday, Sept. 26 — Architectural Scavenger Hunt, 5-7:30 p.m., Leo’s Ristorante, 11 Leo Turo Way  There are so many new buildings going up in Worcester, it can be easy to forget about the treasure trove of historic, intriguing and captivating old buildings that continue to lend character, culture and rising heating bills to every hilly neighborhood and winding one-way street in the city.

Pastor Judith Hanlon

Inbox [Sept. 24-30]: News and notes from Worcester State, Becker, city, WPI, LGBT Asylum Task Force

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

Worcester State raises nearly $17M in Change Lives campaign

Worcester State University announced it has raised $16.9 million through the recently completed Change Lives Campaign, exceeding its $15 million goal.

WSU President Barry Maloney thanked donors for their support of scholarships, academic programs and transformational capital projects during a Gala of Gratitude celebration last night [Saturday, Sept. 23] in the school’s recently opened Wellness Center.

More than 7,000 donors contributed to the success of this five-year campaign, which is the third and largest in the Worcester State Foundation’s history.

Inbox [Sept. 20]: News and notes from Worcester Public Schools, WPI, Antiquarian Society, You Inc., MassDOT and New England Beauty Expo

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

Patriots, SNHU help upgrade technology at two schools

The New England Patriots Foundation and Southern New Hampshire University joined students at Elm Park Community School and Goddard School of Science & Technology to unveil state-of-the-art technology labs.

The schools each received a $25,000 grant from the Patriots Foundation and SNHU earlier this year to help improve technology resources for schools in need.

The tech labs will include new Chromebooks, charging carts, a Smart TV and a Chromecast. In addition, the Foundation and SNHU have completely renovated the labs, purchased new furniture, and added Patriots-themed décor and wall decals.

Registration open for WPI Tech Girls program

Worcester Weekly: stART on the Street, Clustertruck + more, Sept. 17-23

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too.

Sunday, Sept. 17 — stART on the Street, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Park Avenue, between Highland and Pleasant streets  If you’re going to bring gridlock to the heart of the city, you might as well do it with hundreds of talented artists, crafters and performers, and a list of activities longer than the backup on Chandler Street. That’s the great thing about stART on the Street — with so many cool things to see and do, for once nobody’s worried about the traffic.

David Barsamian

Inbox [Sept. 17-23]: News and notes from Worcester State, Becker, Anna Maria, Friends of Goddard Library, GWCF and Library Foundation

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

David Barsamian to speak at WSU Tuesday

Broadcaster, author and award-winning investigative journalist David Barsamian will be the first speaker featured in Worcester State University’s new Provost’s Series on Democracy and Diplomacy.

Barsamian will deliver two talks. The first is a campus lecture, “The New Political Resistance in the Age of Trump,” at 10 a.m. Tuesday in the May Street Building, 280 May St.; the second, a community lecture, “Media, Propaganda, and U.S. Foreign Policy,” at 7 p.m. Ghosh Science and Technology Center, Room 102, 486 Chandler St.

Inbox [Sept. 6]: News and notes from Clark, Wheelock, DCU, Literacy Volunteers, Commonwealth Corp., St. Peter-Marian

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

Clark prof receives 2018 ‘Upstander’ honor from World Without Genocide

Clark University history Professor Taner Akçam will be honored with the 2018 Outstanding Upstander Award from the World Without Genocide organization for his work promoting justice and the rule of law.

World Without Genocide, housed at the Mitchell Hamline School of Law in St. Paul, Minnesota, works “to protect innocent people around the world; prevent genocide by combating racism and prejudice; advocate for the prosecution of perpetrators; and remember those whose lives and cultures have been destroyed by violence.”

Akçam, one of the first Turkish intellectuals to acknowledge and openly discuss the Armenian Genocide, holds the only endowed chair dedicated to research and teaching on this subject.

Editorial: Caring community hits back at Hurricane Harvey

It almost seems unreal that the lingering nightmare to our south is as bad as it is, while we have enjoyed calm summer weather since Hurricane Harvey hit Texas nine days ago.

But it is real. And catastrophic, affecting millions in the path of the slow-moving monster. Relentless rain, historic flooding and fierce winds and have caused dozens of deaths, widespread heartbreak and alarm, and billions of dollars worth of damage to Houston along with a swath of cities and towns in East Texas and beyond.

Once a category 4 hurricane, the storm has poured plenty of misery on Louisiana, Tennessee and Kentucky and northward, and will dump water on us today. On its heels, young Irma seems to be amassing similar power and could impact the United States.

Here in Worcester in a few days, we won’t only be watching all this but doing something about it.

On Beacon Hill: Rain, rain go away — time for legislators to make some hay

Recap and analysis of the week in local, state and federal government from State House News Service and Sun research.

BOSTON — As Hurricane Harvey stalled and Irma churned, Massachusetts wondered what if — as in what if 50 inches of rain fell in the Hub and Boston literally turned into a city on a hill.

“If we got hit with a storm like this, if Harvey hit Boston Harbor, we’re wiped out as a city,” Boston Mayor Marty Walsh predicted.

But as with many things that come with price tags in the billions, decisions about how to deal with the hypothetical are often pushed off for another day. State House News Service is now taking bets on what will get built first, South Coast rail or a harbor hurricane barrier wall?

As the final days of summer peeled off the calendar, the best Bay Staters could do for now was raid their pantries and wallets, and offer a helping hand in Houston where floodwaters decimated many parts of that city in a disaster that experts say will be felt for years to come.

The Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency offered up three firefighting teams trained in water rescues, while a Beverly-based FEMA task force of first responders was already on the ground in Texas.

With one eye on Houston, the run-up to the long Labor Day weekend meant it was time for lawmakers, the governor, the attorney general and the treasurer to finish their summer homework assignments before the first class bells have all been rung.

Senators wrapped up a series of dialogues they’ve been holding in anticipation of writing a healthcare cost control bill this fall, while Treasurer Deborah Goldberg, Attorney General Maura Healey and Gov. Charlie Baker met an end-of-August deadline to make appointments to the new Cannabis Control Commission.

Despite whispers of the difficulties in finding commissioners who match the legal qualifications and are willing to work for the prescribed salaries, now former state Sen. Jennifer Flanagan — who was named by Baker last week to the “Triple C” — has company.

Pixabay

The Cannabis Control Commission is finally in full bloom.

Goldberg turned to former Bain & Company partner Steve Hoffman to chair the pot panel, and Healey named a former assistant attorney general, Britte McBride, as her pick. Together the three elected officials rounded out the board with former deputy general counsel to the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Kay Doyle and Shaleen Title, co-founder of cannabis recruiting firm THC Staffing Group.

Title, who helped write Question 4 in 2016, finds herself outnumbered by marijuana legalization opponents four to one, perhaps a predictable outcome given the public positions of officials charged with picking the board.

Hoffman, who is now retired, will pull down a $160,000 salary as chair, while the other four will earn $120,000 a year for five years as they work to turn the legal pot industry from seed to plant by next summer and keep it blooming in the years to come.

— Matt Murphy

ALSO ON THE AGENDA

  • Back-to-school means back to work for Legislature
  • Baker draws fire from gubernatorial challenger
  • Warren on #DeVosWatch, Chandler goes back to school
  • State college savings program on tap for East Middle in limbo

Inbox [Sept. 3-9]: News and notes from Railers, WCAC, Research Bureau, GIlman Scholars and WPI

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

Rucker, Myers rated among most influential people in New England hockey

Worcester Railers HC team owner Cliff Rucker and team president Michael G. Myers have been included in the New England Hockey Journal’s 2017 100 most influential people in New England hockey list.

The 100 most influential people in New England hockey include team owners, team presidents, coaches, writers and more.

Rucker was recognized for his success in returning a professional hockey team to Worcester, and his investment in the building of the Fidelity Bank Worcester Ice Center, a 100,000-square-foot practice facility for the Railers.