Inbox [July 23-29]: News and notes from Ascentria, Veterans Inc., Boys & Girls Club of Worcester, South Bay Community Services and Signature Chefs Auction

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

Ascentria Care Alliance acquires skilled care facility

Worcester-based Ascentria Care Alliance, one of the largest human-services organizations in New England, has acquired the Laurel Ridge Rehabilitation and Skilled Care Center in Jamaica Plain.

Ascentria administers a broad range of residential and community-based programs to meet the spectrum of needs of older adults and their families. Laurel Ridge complements those offerings as a 120-bed rehabilitation and skilled care center.

Recalde’s Sidewalk Café is an unexpected slice of home

The name Recalde’s Sidewalk Café gives off a sense of ambiguity — especially for a place known as much for its tostones as its coffee. Its presence, with eye-catching full-length windows and a newly installed awning, is satisfying enough to ask the question, “What is Recalde’s all about?”

Nestled on the corner of Pleasant and Abbott streets, not far from Park Avenue, Recalde’s Sidewalk Café is a transformative experience of authentic Spanish cuisine.

With salsa music playing in the background, the sounds of the Spanish language lingering in the air and the open-arms welcome from their employees, Recalde’s Sidewalk Café, open since February, is all about the Spanish culture. It’s an effort embracing and elevating the feeling of eating at abuela’s house.

Worcester Weekly: Mercantile Center beer festival + more, July 16-22

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too.

Tuesday, July 18 — “The Two Gentlemen of Verona,” 7-9 p.m., Sprinkler Factory, 38 Harlow St.  Never among Shakespeare’s blockbusters — it was among his first-known plays — “Verona” nonetheless endures as a popular staple for the scores of summer performers who worship at the altar of the Bard.

The Shakespeare Academy @ Stratford’s Alumni Co. adds a “1980’s romantic comedy twist” to the story of “four lovers’ lives thrown into a chaos filled with passionate love, heartbreak, betrayal and forgiveness. And, let’s not forget, an insane amount of laughs.” Suggested donation is $5.

The daughter also rises: 50 years of family at Foley & Son Fish and Chips

Back in 1967, the original Foleys – Evelyn and Eugene – thought it was a pretty sure bet that one of their five sons would want to be part of their new business. So they hung a sign above their shop at the corner of Franklin and Plantation streets that read Foley & Son Fish and Chips.

Fifty years later the shop and the sign are still there, but it’s their youngest and their only daughter, Patti J. Foley, with assistance from a few others each week, who is running the show – balancing the books, cutting the fish and sweating by the fryolators.

“When my mom opened it in 1967, she also sold grinders and pizza in addition to fish and chips. But the combination never really took off. So she decided to do only fish and chips,” Foley said. “This was her part-time job when we were all growing up.”

Art Simas / For Worcester Sun

The original sign still hangs above 274 Plantation St.

Years ago, there were several fish-and-chip restaurants in Worcester, including Robert’s Fish and Chips, named after Robert J. Sutherland, who was also known as the King of Fish and Chips in Worcester.

More Worcester Sun:

Foley said, “My mother and he were best friends and he had about eight restaurants on one time, all named after members of his family. My mom ran his Belmont Street store for years before she landed at the Plantation Street location here. And the rest is history.”

Webster Five

Inbox [July 5]: News and notes from Webster Five, Citi Foundation, Worcester Public Schools, Price Rite and commonwealth of Mass.

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

Webster Five donates $5K to Community Legal Aid

The Webster Five Foundation announced that as part of the Web of Caring to Make a Difference program, it will donate $5,000 to Community Legal Aid Inc. The money will help pay for the organization’s interpretation and translation expenses in Worcester County.

Community Legal Aid (CLA) is the civil legal aid program serving low-income and elderly residents of Worcester, Hampden, Hampshire, Franklin and Berkshire counties. Its mission is to improve people’s lives through legal assistance that protects fundamental rights, secures access to basic needs, and challenges policies and practices that harm its clients.

Worcester Weekly: Cars of Summer, WikiLeaks vigil + more, July 2-8

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too. 

Sunday, July 2 — Cars of Summer Car Show, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Green Hill Park, 50 Skyline Drive  Well, since it’s summer in New England and there’s road work in progress on every possible route GPS can imagine for you, might as well recalculate yourself to Green Hill Park for a chance to get bumper to bumper with scores of cars you actually want to look at. Last year’s Best in Show was a 1955 Nash Ambassador, but there will be dozens of roadsters, pickups, muscle cars, hot rods and specialty vehicles to suit any enthusiast’s taste.

Worcester Weekly: Fireworks at East Park, new WAM exhibit + more, June 25-July 1

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too.

Ongoing — “Reusable Universes:” Shih Chieh Huang, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St.  While Stephen Hawking keeps telling everyone humans need to find an Earth 2.0 — and fast (well, relatively) — Shih Chieh Huang and WAM are content right where they are, exploring the possibilities of transforming modern technology into thought-provoking, awe-inspiring art.

“ ‘Reusable Universes’ resonates with the spirit of innovation and curiosity that continues to ground Worcester today. Huang’s art also will provoke the viewer to consider society’s rapidly changing relationship with technology.” The exhibit runs through Nov. 12. Admission is $14; $12 for college students with ID and seniors; $6 for kids (free for members and kids under 3).

Nothing usual about The Chameleon opening on Shrewsbury Street

The restaurant space at 166 Shrewsbury St. is changing its name — not to mention its owners, concept, menu and decor — again.

And under its new banner, at The Chameleon the changes will keep on coming.

Planning a June 26 opening, The Chameleon — which will feature a distinct menu and concept for each of the four seasons — will take over the space briefly occupied by The Usual after years of success, and ensuing moves to larger homes, by Niche Hospitality Group’s Mezcal Tequila Cantina and The Fix Burger Bar.

(The restaurant was also expected to attempt a soft opening last night [June 20] for the annual Taste of Shrewsbury Street event.)

The Usual, billed as a creative sandwich eatery, closed on May 28, about six months after opening, amid fallout from the arrest of Kevin Perry, who owned the property and whose wife, Stacey (Gala) Perry, is listed as the restaurant’s owner.

Patrick Sargent / For Worcester Sun

The Chameleon, 166 Shrewsbury St.

Kevin A. Perry Jr. is accused of using millions of dollars in illicit drug profits to buy several properties in Worcester and Millbury, including 166 Shrewsbury St. and The Blackstone Tap at 81 Water St.

For George’s Bakery, bread is where the heart is

“Lucian Sbat came to Worcester from Aleppo, Syria, 18 years ago. He heard about George’s Bakery shortly after his arrival in Worcester, but could never believe his friends when they’d try to convince him the bread tasted authentic.” And now he stops by the Grafton Hill mainstay three times a week — much like generations of city folks who’ve made George’s Bakery a true survivor.