Dark tourism: Why tourists go to sites associated with death and suffering

“I am an educator of the Holocaust, and my travel course takes students through Central Europe to a number of Holocaust sites. The aim is to provide students with a hands-on learning experience. However, some could well argue that this course is just another form of ‘dark tourism’ – an interest in locations that are associated with human suffering and death. What is so problematic about dark tourism? And are there redeeming features that make it worthwhile?” Daniel B. Bitran is a Professor of Psychology at the College of the Holy Cross. This article was originally published on The Conversation.

Sen. Moore: Solving the Alzheimer’s puzzle

Alzheimer’s permeates nearly every community in our country, forcing millions of families to suffer through the pain of having loved ones gradually forget the people and memories they previously cherished. The burden placed on these families can be overwhelming.

Mandell: A San Francisco/East Bay wake-up call — will Worcester’s renaissance benefit all?

No, this is not India, but the United States. How can this injustice be sustainable? How would it be different here if we all were committed to building fair, healthy and loving places? Maybe I do need the Kleenex the homeless man tried to give me on the BART train ride. … Not only is the renaissance on the horizon, but we need to plan for the negative impacts of growth as well — that many of us will be closed out of its benefits.

Tips from the Pros: Top six myths about MBEs

Myths have a negative impact on MBE [minority business enterprise] success because legends can reinforce or encourage bad decisions by aspiring entrepreneurs and MBEs — decisions that can be critical and sometimes fatal to the establishment or growth of the businesses. Joset Wright-Lacy, president of the National Minority Supplier Development Council, explains.

She’s always been a hustler: The Soofi family story

Imrana Soofi and her two sons, Ali and Shahbaz, are many things. They are Bengali-Americans, with Imrana immigrating here to the United States in 1981 as a young girl. They are Muslims. They are entrepreneurs, hustlers, inspiring hard-workers and, perhaps most of all, givers.

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To the editor: After years of negotiations, Worcester Central Catholic School teachers plan protest to urge fair compensation

“Since 2010, the central office has offered only four step increases, and has not agreed to a cost-of-living increase during any of those years. It is DELTA’s hope that the central office will recognize the need for meaningful change and come to a salary agreement that will begin to fairly compensate their teachers, thereby ensuring that the students in the Catholic schools continue to benefit.”

Worcester 2.0: An outsider’s inside look at the city’s developing future

In Istanbul, I was drowned in the city and its events, while in Worcester I have to dig in to reach them. In Istanbul, a machine of 15 million, I always felt disposable and replaceable. In Worcester, I feel more significant. … But where do people of color and/or lower income stand within this revitalizing/renewing Worcester? How much are they incorporated into this transformation? What are their roles?

Mandell: Closing the book on Jane Week in Worcester

“Jane Jacobs offered us a different paradigm of development that is incremental, organic, holistic, small scale, and based on the talents and energy of locals. Some of the best examples of a taste of Jane are right here in the Canal District and in what I saw in full action on a [Jane Week] tour of Main South. Worcester is on the cusp of a true renaissance! Can’t you feel it in the air?”

To the editor: Pipelines under pressure in Massachusetts

“Today’s ‘natural’ gas is loaded with carcinogens injected during the fracking process. Should Spectra construct an extremely high-pressure pipeline which might leak or explode, Grafton assumes enormous risk while Texas-based Spectra benefits.”