Joe's Albums

Joe’s Albums helps lead resurgence of vinyl and retail on Main Street

“Between size and proximity, I wanted to get more ‘central’ and larger. I had looked in the Canal District … then looked down here and saw all of the development going on and thought that was very intriguing. We’re still a few more years away from what’s going to happen, but I think Worcester is truly coming back this time.” Art Simas reports on the place where vinyl records and retail are making a comeback.

Songs in the key of healing: Worcester Center for Expressive Therapies offers hope

Older patients who had suffered a stroke had lost the ability to speak, but would still be able to sing. Patients who have been unable to walk have found their stride with the assistance of the center’s music therapy. These stories aren’t as improbable as they seem. “Music activates both sides of the brain,” said Kayla Daly, owner/director. “Music can re-create new neural connections in the brain.”

Worcester Weekly: ‘Evita,’ Redcoats and Creative Hub Kick-Off, Aug. 6-12

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too.

Road trip!

Sunday, Aug. 6 — Redcoats & Rebels, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Old Sturbridge Village, 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road, Sturbridge  Am I the only one who thinks President Trump would be super-confused by OSV? It all seems so real. Does the Mass Pike get us back to 2017?! Get me a flux capacitor for The Beast, stat! Being so close to the drug-infested dens of New Hampshire, though, maybe he’ll just think he’s hallucinating off a contact high.

Inbox [Aug. 2]: News and notes from East Side CDC, Worcester Wares, WPI, Holy Cross, MassDiGI, Ninety Nine and YOU Inc.

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

East Side CDC lands $125K in Brownfields funding

Worcester East Side Community Development Corp. recently received $125,000 in Brownfields Redevelopment funding.

The award was one of nine worth $1.5 million from the Baker-Polito administration.

East Side CDC will use the award for assessment of a site that will become eight units of garden-style, handicap-accessible housing for extremely low-income or potential homeless residents while they continue to receive supportive services from the Department of Mental Health.

Read the entire story on the Commonwealth of Massachusetts website

Worcester Wares calling for artists

Worcester Weekly: #Worcester100, Lobsta Laughs + more, July 30-Aug. 5

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too.

Quick note: Worcester Restaurant Week — which is actually two weeks long, because, y’know, math’s not our strong suit here in the Heart of the Commonwealth — begins Monday. If you didn’t know that already, you should probably just make it official and move to Springfield.

Tuesday, Aug. 1 — Medicinal Flora of Massachusetts exhibit, 7:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Lamar Soutter Library, UMass Medical School, 55 Lake Ave. North  Boy, those doctors and scientists and researchers sure are clever. Excellent timing, too. Just as Gov. Charlie Baker finally signed the divisive and much-anticipated legal marijuana bill late last week, the smartypants down at UMass aim to highlight lesser-known herbal remedies that can be found among the Bay State’s greenery.

Worcester Weekly: Helping refugees, Canal District veggies + more, July 23-29

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too.

Road trip!

Sunday, July 23 — 2017 DockDogs Day, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Klem’s, 117 W. Main St., Spencer  Tommy used to work on the docks. Guess you could say, he’s been down on his luck — especially since the union went on strike. And without Tommy — or Bon Jovi — around the docks, well, they’ve gone to the dogs. It’s tough.

Worcester Weekly: Cars of Summer, WikiLeaks vigil + more, July 2-8

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too. 

Sunday, July 2 — Cars of Summer Car Show, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Green Hill Park, 50 Skyline Drive  Well, since it’s summer in New England and there’s road work in progress on every possible route GPS can imagine for you, might as well recalculate yourself to Green Hill Park for a chance to get bumper to bumper with scores of cars you actually want to look at. Last year’s Best in Show was a 1955 Nash Ambassador, but there will be dozens of roadsters, pickups, muscle cars, hot rods and specialty vehicles to suit any enthusiast’s taste.

Songs in the key of healing: Worcester Center for Expressive Therapies offers hope

The emerging studies supporting the transformative capabilities music has on human cognition are the basis for the Worcester Center for Expressive Therapies’  distinctive, thoroughly trained approach.

For the many clients the center takes, this creative wonderland is a space for community and healing. The center “is a small, functioning family unit,” says Kayla Daly, owner and director of the cozy, multi-sensory therapy space in the 255 Park Ave. office complex.

Since the center opened in 2013, it has incorporated a dynamic duo of board-certified clinical musicianship and licensed counseling to provide a multi-disciplinary therapy approach from a staff of highly trained clinicians. The four session rooms and sprawling studio room are filled with instruments, drawing desks, toys and more to create an atmosphere that’s immediately comforting.

The center functions as a family, Daly said, to provide “multi-sensory” clinical treatment with diversely trained counselors. It works with a mindset that uniquely approaches the challenge of incorporating counseling and music therapy. Each clinician at the center is well-equipped to rise to the challenge, because extensive certification and training in multiple fields are required.

Watch: Worcester Center for Expressive Therapies promotional video

Sina-cism: The right slant on the First Amendment

Although the First Amendment may be back in vogue at The New York Times, at least for now, not everyone agrees with Matal v. Tam.
Chris Sinacola

Chris Sinacola

Last Monday was a very good day for the First Amendment. In Matal v. Tam, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously that the disparagement clause of the Trademark Act of 1946 is unconstitutional.

The case involved Simon Young, aka Simon Tam, the 36-year-old lead singer of “The Slants,” an all-Asian-American band whose members chose their name as expressive of three things — their views on life, their music, and their desire to reclaim and empower a phrase traditionally seen as derogatory.

After the U.S. Trademark and Patent Office sought to deny the band a trademark on the grounds that its chosen name was offensive, Tam went to federal court and won on appeal. The Supreme Court ruling affirmed that decision.

In the December 2015 appeals court ruling, Judge Kimberly A. Moore wrote: “It is a bedrock principle underlying the First Amendment that the government may not penalize private speech merely because it disapproves of the message it conveys.”

In the minds of activists and their lawyers, of course, there are always other considerations, including the idea that trademarks are government speech.

Related Sina-cism: Muzzling the First Amendment on campus

Worcester Weekly: Fireworks at East Park, new WAM exhibit + more, June 25-July 1

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too.

Ongoing — “Reusable Universes:” Shih Chieh Huang, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St.  While Stephen Hawking keeps telling everyone humans need to find an Earth 2.0 — and fast (well, relatively) — Shih Chieh Huang and WAM are content right where they are, exploring the possibilities of transforming modern technology into thought-provoking, awe-inspiring art.

“ ‘Reusable Universes’ resonates with the spirit of innovation and curiosity that continues to ground Worcester today. Huang’s art also will provoke the viewer to consider society’s rapidly changing relationship with technology.” The exhibit runs through Nov. 12. Admission is $14; $12 for college students with ID and seniors; $6 for kids (free for members and kids under 3).