Joe's Albums

Joe’s Albums helps lead resurgence of vinyl and retail on Main Street

“Between size and proximity, I wanted to get more ‘central’ and larger. I had looked in the Canal District … then looked down here and saw all of the development going on and thought that was very intriguing. We’re still a few more years away from what’s going to happen, but I think Worcester is truly coming back this time.” Art Simas reports on the place where vinyl records and retail are making a comeback.

Marotta: Time for education system to evolve — just ask the teachers

“I find students come into my classroom with more and more obstacles,” says Abby Morgan, a middle school art educator in Framingham.

“With social media, the internet and the whole digital, globalized world, they have unlimited access to everything. While that kind of access can be exciting and a great opportunity for learning, it can also be incredibly stressful for a young person to navigate, especially if they are already facing challenges at home or in their everyday life.”

So how does society navigate all the possible goals of education reform in the 21st century?

Editorial: Courting Amazon, and all that comes with it

Amazon plans quite a delivery to a North American city next year, and it’s not coming in a UPS truck.

It’s the recently announced second headquarters, or “HQ2,” for the famous Seattle-based company, and Worcester is one of many cities vying to be chosen for the site.

The city decided last month to apply — competing locally against Boston and a dozen or so other Massachusetts cities. In addition to Boston, the list of major-player hopefuls reportedly includes Chicago, Denver, New York City and Washington, D.C.

The application deadline is Thursday, Oct. 19. Some competitors for the headquarters are bending over backwards in lavish or quirky ways to get Amazon’s attention.

Will Amazon look Worcester’s way for more than a glance?

Sun Spots with Hitch [Vol. 206]: Pot restrictions high on City Council wish list

Twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia now have laws on the books legalizing marijuana to some extent.

And with California’s massive medical marijuana infrastructure expected to buoy a potential $7 billion recreational marketplace, experts see no end in sight to the pot shop proliferation.

In Worcester, up to 15 licenses could be awarded once state regulators open the floodgates next July. And city councilors want their say on where these retail outlets will put down roots.Hitch is hungry for answers.

Hitch is hungry for answers.

Sina-cism: For those taking a knee, it’s 4th down

It’s fourth down for athletes taking a knee to protest racial injustice and oppression in America.

Chris Sinacola

Chris Sinacola

Our stand-up-for-Old-Glory millionaire billionaire president, who in his spare time runs the country, was both impetuous and intemperate in his recent spats with the kneel-during-the-anthem millionaires who in their spare time play football.

But Trump was also mostly right.

Sure, NFL players are free to express themselves, as are those who follow their example, such as Doherty High player Mike Oppong, who a year ago took a knee to protest injustice. But that which is permissible is not always wise.

On Beacon Hill: Cost sharing … and caring

Recap and analysis of the week in local, state and federal government from State House News Service and Sun research.

BOSTON — So, how many days a week do you suppose Charlie Baker wakes up and thinks, “GOD, I wish Hillary had won!”?

“Seven” may be a valid guess. Because an inconvenient truth has stalked Baker’s political life since the election of Donald Trump: his job would have been enormously easier this year, and his job security greater, had Hillary Clinton been elected. That truth came into starker-than-ever relief last week.

Baker was getting ready to leave for Las Vegas to talk clean energy as news broke that his party’s leader was hoping to demolish Obamacare by allowing the sale of low-cost, low-benefit plans aimed at the young and healthy, and withholding subsidies for insurance copays to the poor at the state level.

It was easy to anticipate Baker’s reaction: walking through a well-worn script that boils down to the message: “Don’t Blame Me, I’m From Massachusetts.” And pretty much, the people of Massachusetts haven’t.

Guns. Gays. Coal. Immigration. Contraceptives. Climate change. On almost every eye-catching Trump maneuver this year, the governor’s instinct for pragmatism in rhetoric and decision-making has seen him through. But now, the veteran number-cruncher and former health insurance executive faces more daunting budget and policy challenges, caused by Republicans.

Flickr / Gage Skidmore

President Trump

The president signed a short executive order Thursday fostering the creation of new bare-bones plans with low premiums, aimed at people whose health needs are few. He said the move addresses one of the main complaints about Obamacare — not enough choice for consumers.

Then came the blockbuster: The president announced he plans to end $9 billion in “cost-sharing reduction” subsidies that enable the functioning of Obamacare on the state level. The president pointed out that the payments were never funded by Congress, but rather paid through administrative accounts controlled by the Executive Branch.

U.S. House Republicans sued over the matter three years ago, arguing the administration has no right to fund a major program like this without congressional appropriation. They won. Even so, officials from both parties had urged Trump to continue the payments, and Baker was out in front.

As with most everything except, perhaps, the national Marine Monument off Cape Cod, the governor disagrees with his president on the dismantling of Obamacare. That frequent disavowal has made his most potent political rival, state Attorney General Maura Healey, arguably his most potent policy ally.

As she’s done many a time this year, Healey said she’d go to court against the federal administration, aligned with Baker’s point of view, joining other state AGs in a lawsuit to block termination of the CSR’s.

For his part, Baker issued a statement that “the Trump Administration is making the wrong decision to eliminate cost-sharing reductions for all 50 states, as it will destabilize insurance markets and jeopardize coverage for thousands of Massachusetts residents.” [See more on Baker’s and Healey’s reactions below.]

Health coverage and its provision to the poor had already made the administration’s life complicated last week, as the Massachusetts Health Connector that administers public insurance for low-income residents tried to set rates for MassHealth for the coming year.

The Connector was expected to announce 2018 MassHealth rates early in the week, but delayed its announcement to make a last-second decision as to whether premiums should rise an average of 10.5 percent or 26.1 percent. The lower rate was announced as official Thursday, but it was contingent on … continuance of the CSR’s, which the president announced at 10 p.m. that evening would be ending. The Connector said it would explore “alternative pathways.”

The flurry of healthcare developments came at the end of a short week that was long on news even before the Grand Finale.

— Craig Sandler

ALSO ON THE AGENDA

  • Three finalists for Cannabis Commission director to be interviewed Tuesday
  • McGovern on Trump’s Iran move, Polito on domestic violence
  • Baker, Healey rail against Trump healthcare maneuver
  • Watch: Chang-Diaz, others weigh in on criminal justice reform
  • Senate gun bill restricting bump stocks set for House showdown

Worcester Weekly: Clark zombies, WPI football + more, Oct. 15-21

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too.

Monday, Oct. 16 — Hops & Harmony at the Hall, 6 p.m. [doors open at 5:30], Mechanics Hall, 321 Main St.  Sometimes all it takes is a little liquid courage to let your inner Bruno Mars or Lady Gaga out of the shower and into the eardrums of — gasp! — real, live other people. Disclaimer: the Worcester Sun and its affiliates do not recommend consuming alcohol in the shower (unless you’re in a 1980s baseball movie).

Still in its infancy, the Hops & Harmony series is intended to be “a fun night of live music with audience participation. Enjoy time with friends, meet new ones, and learn popular music in three parts for fun and YouTube stardom. This get-out-of-the-house experience is a great way to unwind and let loose after a long day.” Tickets are $5.

Inbox [Oct. 15-21]: News and notes from UMass Medical School, Worcester State, Clark and Stone Soup, Y.Litigate and You Inc.

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

UMass Medical School receives $10M gift for rare-diseases research

A new institute for rare-diseases research at UMass Medical School will build on the school’s already substantial accomplishments in the fields of gene therapy, RNA biology and RNAi technology to accelerate the development of novel therapeutics for a host of disorders, Chancellor Michael F. Collins said.

The Li Weibo Institute for Rare Diseases Research, supported by a $10 million endowment gift from the Li Weibo Charitable Foundation in China, will be home to existing faculty whose expertise has led to profound discoveries related to diseases such as ALS, cystic fibrosis, Canavan disease, Rett syndrome, Huntington’s disease, fragile X syndrome, CDKL5 disorder and others.