Ninety Nine

Inbox [July 19]: News and notes from Loyal Techs, Ninety Nine restaurant, Community Harvest Project, Clemente Course Worcester and YWCA Central Mass.

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

On-site, on-demand tech support startup Loyal Techs launches in Worcester

Loyal Techs, an on-demand support service, has launched, aiming to revolutionize the way consumers receive on-site and remote technical support.

With the click of a button, Worcester residents can book affordable and expert tech support for Windows, macOS, Android, and iOS. It’s a simple, inexpensive and convenient option for troubleshooting and fixing tech issues without booking a pushed-out appointment with a hefty price tag.

“Our only focus is our awesome customers and the services we provide,” says Anthony Inguaggiato, CEO of Loyal Techs. “Our goal is to provide the best tech support anyone has ever experienced. We want to be the only tech support option you think of for on-demand high-quality support.”

Recalde’s Sidewalk Café is an unexpected slice of home

The name Recalde’s Sidewalk Café gives off a sense of ambiguity — especially for a place known as much for its tostones as its coffee. Its presence, with eye-catching full-length windows and a newly installed awning, is satisfying enough to ask the question, “What is Recalde’s all about?”

Nestled on the corner of Pleasant and Abbott streets, not far from Park Avenue, Recalde’s Sidewalk Café is a transformative experience of authentic Spanish cuisine.

With salsa music playing in the background, the sounds of the Spanish language lingering in the air and the open-arms welcome from their employees, Recalde’s Sidewalk Café, open since February, is all about the Spanish culture. It’s an effort embracing and elevating the feeling of eating at abuela’s house.

The daughter also rises: 50 years of family at Foley & Son Fish and Chips

Back in 1967, the original Foleys – Evelyn and Eugene – thought it was a pretty sure bet that one of their five sons would want to be part of their new business. So they hung a sign above their shop at the corner of Franklin and Plantation streets that read Foley & Son Fish and Chips.

Fifty years later the shop and the sign are still there, but it’s their youngest and their only daughter, Patti J. Foley, with assistance from a few others each week, who is running the show – balancing the books, cutting the fish and sweating by the fryolators.

“When my mom opened it in 1967, she also sold grinders and pizza in addition to fish and chips. But the combination never really took off. So she decided to do only fish and chips,” Foley said. “This was her part-time job when we were all growing up.”

Art Simas / For Worcester Sun

The original sign still hangs above 274 Plantation St.

Years ago, there were several fish-and-chip restaurants in Worcester, including Robert’s Fish and Chips, named after Robert J. Sutherland, who was also known as the King of Fish and Chips in Worcester.

More Worcester Sun:

Foley said, “My mother and he were best friends and he had about eight restaurants on one time, all named after members of his family. My mom ran his Belmont Street store for years before she landed at the Plantation Street location here. And the rest is history.”

Sun Spots with Hitch [Vol. 175]: At Wild Willy’s, reservations for Maura Healey

You can always count on a little extracurricular excitement in and around Worcester’s myriad bars and restaurants. And once summer gets into full swing, tempers tend to flare faster than the mercury rises.

So it was that a regional burger chain became a crime scene last weekend after one employee allegedly stabbed another.

Where does Maura Healey, the state’s liberally ambitious (or is it ambitiously liberal) attorney general, fit in? Stay cool — Hitch will tell you!

Nothing usual about The Chameleon opening on Shrewsbury Street

The restaurant space at 166 Shrewsbury St. is changing its name — not to mention its owners, concept, menu and decor — again.

And under its new banner, at The Chameleon the changes will keep on coming.

Planning a June 26 opening, The Chameleon — which will feature a distinct menu and concept for each of the four seasons — will take over the space briefly occupied by The Usual after years of success, and ensuing moves to larger homes, by Niche Hospitality Group’s Mezcal Tequila Cantina and The Fix Burger Bar.

(The restaurant was also expected to attempt a soft opening last night [June 20] for the annual Taste of Shrewsbury Street event.)

The Usual, billed as a creative sandwich eatery, closed on May 28, about six months after opening, amid fallout from the arrest of Kevin Perry, who owned the property and whose wife, Stacey (Gala) Perry, is listed as the restaurant’s owner.

Patrick Sargent / For Worcester Sun

The Chameleon, 166 Shrewsbury St.

Kevin A. Perry Jr. is accused of using millions of dollars in illicit drug profits to buy several properties in Worcester and Millbury, including 166 Shrewsbury St. and The Blackstone Tap at 81 Water St.

For George’s Bakery, bread is where the heart is

“Lucian Sbat came to Worcester from Aleppo, Syria, 18 years ago. He heard about George’s Bakery shortly after his arrival in Worcester, but could never believe his friends when they’d try to convince him the bread tasted authentic.” And now he stops by the Grafton Hill mainstay three times a week — much like generations of city folks who’ve made George’s Bakery a true survivor.

A visionary Worcester under fire

Cranes left dormant for months have come back to life in the city of Worcester, as the thawing weather has once again opened the city’s streets and neighborhoods to the hum of machinery and smell of molten asphalt.

In each vat poured and block stacked, these alterations to the cityscape mark the partial realization of a vision for Worcester, its businesses and its residents. Yet the underpinnings of any vision emerge from a broad pool of opinions, and therefore are subject to debate.

For one Worcester resident, the standard-bearer for Worcester’s future is the city’s Main South neighborhood.

“I mean, you look at it [and] you have a very dense commercial corridor, you have mixed-use buildings that have storefronts and housing,” said Joyce Mandell, noting the mix of churches, schools and residential buildings in Main South. In short, the community exists as its own organism, with workers living within walking distance of their jobs.

The provocative idea to model the city’s future on a symbol of its troubled past often seemingly neglected in the present by the powers-that-be, arises from this resident of Worcester for over two decades, with a doctorate in sociology from Boston College. Mandell sees the city through her lens as a soldier of Jane Jacobs — the 20th-century New York thought-leader on urban development who believed in dense corridors, short blocks and a “power to the people” ethos, and who inspired Mandell on her yearlong blog Jane Jacobs in the Woo and Jane Week series in May.

Mandell is an enthusiastic and engaging individual; the type of person with whom you find yourself unexpectedly speaking for two hours on a Saturday morning, but not feeling like that time has been lost.

It became clear early on that while Mandell enjoys the city, she positions herself an outsider-in-residency working to challenge an establishment that may have new names behind it, but expresses an ideology that has shaped Worcester for the past half-century.

“We’re going against the tide with the powers-that-be,” the former adjunct-professor at Worcester State University said bluntly.

Worcester 2.0: An outsider’s inside look at the city’s developing future

In Istanbul, I was drowned in the city and its events, while in Worcester I have to dig in to reach them. In Istanbul, a machine of 15 million, I always felt disposable and replaceable. In Worcester, I feel more significant. … But where do people of color and/or lower income stand within this revitalizing/renewing Worcester? How much are they incorporated into this transformation? What are their roles?

Sun Spots with Hitch [Vol. 168]: Getting carried away with plastic bags

Forget about the splintered neighborhoods, persistent crime, aging infrastructure and simmering feud with the teachers union. No time for that stuff — it’s an election year, so let’s talk about banning plastic shopping bags.

Maybe conservative longtime councilor and former mayor Konnie Lukes can see the liberal writing on the wall, as at least one at-large incumbent is likely to be on the outs come November. But still, the city certainly has bigger fish to fry.

Never one to hide behind politics, Hitch has some thoughts.