Worcester Weekly: Holy Cross baseball, autism fundraiser + more, April 23-29

Know about something cool going on that you want to get listed in Worcester Weekly? Send information about your event to info@worcester.ma.

College sports

Sunday, April 23 — Holy Cross baseball doubleheader vs. Bucknell, 1:05 and 4:05 p.m., Hanover Insurance Park at Fitton Field, 1 College St.  After sputtering through the early part of the season with a 2-10 record (including games against prominent national contenders like Auburn and USC), the Crusaders — that’s still their name, right?! — have righted the ship on their way to making noise in the Patriot League tournament. HC was tied with the Bison at 8-4, second place in the conference behind Navy entering the weekend.

Senior first baseman Anthony Critelli, a two-time all-Patriot League selection, is the straw that stirs the drink for the Crusader offense. The right-handed-hitting slugger is batting .321 with 6 home runs, 18 RBI and a .918 OPS. On the mound senior righties Joe Cravero (3.60 ERA, 42 strikeouts in 40 innings), Brendan King (3.75, 3 complete games, .208 average against) and George Capen (3.58 ERA, 17 appearances) lead the way.

For more information

History / Theater

Tuesday, April 25 — “If I am Not for Myself Who Will Be for Me,” 7 p.m., Antiquarian Hall, American Antiquarian Society, 185 Salisbury St.  Oney Judge Staines was not your typical runaway slave.

St. Peter-Marian math team

Inbox [April 23]: News and notes from UMass Medical School, Anna Maria, Holy Cross, SmartAsset, Gallery at Briarwood and St. Peter-Marian

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

UMass Medical School announces commencement speaker

The 44th commencement exercises of UMass Medical School on June 4 will recognize the accomplishments of groundbreaking physician, scientist and academic health leader Valerie Montgomery Rice, MD; humanitarian and businessman Víctor Grífols, president of Grifols; and Patricia Donahoe, MD, a renowned pediatric surgeon and cancer researcher.

Montgomery Rice will be the featured speaker and will receive, along with Grífols and Donahoe, an honorary degree.

Montgomery Rice is the first woman to serve as president and dean of Morehouse School of Medicine. She leads the school toward its strategic goal of “leading the creation and advancement of health equity.” She is a renowned infertility specialist and researcher who earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School.

Worcester Weekly: WPI softball, WSU baseball, ‘Music Man’ + more, April 16-22

Road trip! | School vacation week

Sunday, April 16 — Family Farm Fest, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Old Sturbridge Village, 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road, Sturbridge  No Easter brunch reservations, no problem. Hop on down the Pike to everyone’s favorite school field trip destination. This will be the second day of a weeklong celebration of spring at OSV, featuring living history characters preparing their fields for summer crops — and did we mention baby animals?!

That’s right — newborn lambs, chicks, piglets and calves might just get your kids in the right mood to try some 1830s farm chores (at OSV, definitely not at home!) or listen to “Laura Ingalls Wilder” talk about her “Little House on the Prairie” days. Maybe, maybe not. But odds are pretty solid they’ll be up for the 2 p.m. Great Easter Egg Hunt (for children 10 and under). Additional programs, including live music on the weekends, will be featured through Sunday, April 23.

Inbox [April 9]: City recognized for literacy work, Assumption a national leader in job placement, WPI among best values, Holy Cross promotes educators, Research Bureau announces service award winners

Interesting and worthwhile things happen every day in our community. Alas, we can’t cover them all. That’s where Inbox comes in, to offer readers an easily digestible compilation of interesting and noteworthy items you and your neighbors keep telling us about.

Worcester honored as pacesetter for early literacy work

Worcester has been honored as a pacesetter community by the Campaign for Grade-Level Reading for exemplary work using proven and promising strategies, as well as for its work in addressing the health determinants of early school success.

This recognition comes as part of the review of Worcester’s 2017 All-American City Award application, which was submitted in January.

“Pacesetter Honors are among the highest awards presented by the GLR Campaign,” said Ralph Smith, the managing director of the Campaign for Grade-Level Reading. “We are very proud of Worcester and the numerous organizations and individuals behind the community for joining forces and working tirelessly to uplift children and families. They remind us that we are seeing great progress and real results all across the country.”

Worcester Sun, April 9-15: Mariano on Mount Carmel, a visit to the other Worcester, scholastic lacrosse + much more

Augustine Kanjia returns with his incredible tale of survival. Sinacola on schooling vs. education. Hitch on the Midtown Mall. Our thoughts on more support for police officers. Plus all your weekly favorites, in your April 9-15 Worcester Sun.

Worcester Weekly: Pitch perfect! Cooperstown, Clark baseball … and a cappella, April 2-10

Monday, April 3 — Pruning Fruit Trees workshop, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Jaques Avenue Orchard, 9 Jaques Ave.  Trees have feelings too, you know! (Seriously, some experts believe they do.) So you can’t just go hacking away willy-nilly at the spindly, winter-ravaged limbs of the pear tree your grandmother made you plant in the backyard. No, you need expert hands to make sure your Boscs or Bartletts or Harrow Sweets will come back to you in late summer. That’s where the pros from Tower Hill Botanic Garden come in.

For $20 ($10 for Tower Hill members), “learn the best way to prune fruit trees for health and production.” With the unpredictable nature of New England weather and, well, nature, every little bit helps. Registration is required.

For more information

Tuesday, April 4 — Worcester is America! Opening Ceremony, 6 p.m., Saxe Room, Worcester Public Library, 3 Salem Square  “Worcester is America” — well, I guess that would make for a better city slogan than “Come for the potholes, stay for the dual tax rate!”

Sun Spots with Hitch [Vol. 148]: The Holy Cross Fighting Crusader Debate Team

OK, so by now you know students and faculty at the “most beautiful college campus in Massachusetts” are busy trying to figure out how much trouble they’ll be in with the P.C. Police if they keep The Crusader name atop the student newspaper’s front page.

You’re also likely aware that Holy Cross + controversy = gold mine for Worcester-centric pontificators of all stripes. So, y’know, Hitch wasn’t gonna be left out.

Worcester Weekly: Holy Cross women’s lax + a duel at Mechanics Hall as March turns to April

Road trip!

Sunday, March 26 — Massachusetts Tattoo & Arts Festival, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sturbridge Host Hotel, 366 Main St., Sturbridge  Been a while since you got some ink? Or maybe you’re stuck on an even number — everyone knows that’s bad luck! You should probably drop what you’re doing then, and head on down Route 20 for the last day of this annual convocation of body-decorating artistry.

The festival features dozens of artists from shops across New England, New York and beyond. Tattooing (demonstrations and by appointment), piercings, live entertainment — including Alakazam the Human Knot — vendors, tattoo contests. All for $20 at the door.

For more information

Tuesday, March 28 — Hands-On History Workshop: “Scientific American: The Art of Science in the New Nation,” 6-9 p.m., Goddard-Daniels House, American Antiquarian Society, 190 Salisbury St.  While the ointment seeps in on your new Tom Brady tattoo, you’ll have time to register for this fascinating forum on the evolution of scientific discovery in the good ol’ U.S. of A.

Worcester Sun, March 26-April 1: Mariano scrutinizes PCB chatter, Hitch takes his turn with The Crusader, tag days debate lingers + more

As if you needed more reasons to get in there … Another riveting chapter unfolds as Augustine suffers a heart-wrenching loss as he fills in the blanks back in Motema, Sierra Leone. Sinacola stopped by Clark for a lecture — unsurprisingly common ground was lacking. Plenty more, too, in your March 26-April 1 Worcester Sun.

Sina-cism: Holy Cross should continue its crusade

Whatever the proximate cause for the Holy Cross community’s Crusader debate, it is possible (and to be hoped) that students and faculty will have a meaningful debate.
Chris Sinacola

Chris Sinacola

More than half a century ago, when editors at the student newspaper at Worcester’s College of the Holy Cross decided to change the name of their publication from The Tomahawk to The Crusader, it must have seemed a safe enough move.

But college campuses back in 1955 were nothing like college campuses in 2017, where almost any word or action, no matter how innocuous, can cause an individual or group to take offense, launch a protest, or issue a cry for discussions regarding diversity and respect.

Related Sina-cism: The trouble with trigger warnings

It is hardly surprising that faculty and students at Holy Cross have decided to discuss the name of their newspaper. The crusader is, after all, an unmistakably Christian image that belongs to a particularly sanguinary period of world history, the 175 or so years from 1095 to 1272, when Christian kings and nobles in Europe organized military campaigns to wrest back control of the Holy Land from Muslim conquerors.

Perhaps only divine protection can explain how an image so historically burdened has managed to survive this long. Imagine the microaggressions Holy Cross students have suffered during these last six decades.

If only their consciousness had been raised years ago!