Up Next: Lukes wants to pump brakes on PawSox

Up Next is an occasional preview of the upcoming municipal government and political scene.

While support for the idea of bringing the top Red Sox minor league affiliate to the city is certainly ubiquitous, it is clearly not unanimous. For her part, Councilor at-large Konstantina B. Lukes is saying, “Not so fast.”

And wondering if anyone will hear her.

The one-time mayor and longtime voice of dissent (and often reason) has filed an item on the agenda of the Tuesday, Sept. 5, City Council meeting that brings into question the board’s position on the matter. Or at least, how the council reached its conclusion.

City of Worcester

Konnie Lukes

“I don’t know where this council is coming from,” Lukes told the Sun late last week.

The enthusiasm surrounding the notion of replacing the moribund former Wyman-Gordon property in Green Island — sure, now the Canal District Alliance has time for that side of Kelley Square — with a grand ballpark as the new home of the Triple-A Pawtucket Red Sox has enrapt officials at all levels of city government, not to mention dozens of business leaders, commentators and pretty much all the regular folks.

[In fact, 77 percent of voters in a recent Sun poll said they’d be in favor of the move.]

Solar farm

Inbox [Aug. 20-26] News and notes from Assumption, city of Worcester, Greater Worcester Our Revolution, Quinsigamond CC, and You Inc.

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

Worcester’s economy grows in 2nd quarter

Following a slow start to the year, the Worcester Economic Index, a quarterly economic analysis compiled by Assumption College Professor of Economics Thomas White, Ph.D., has shown that the greater Worcester economy grew at a modest clip during the second quarter of 2017. Since March, the WEI is up 1.1 percent on an annualized basis.

The WEI is estimated using Bureau of Labor Statistics data on employment and unemployment in the Worcester metropolitan area. The unemployment rate slightly increased to 4.6 percent in June while household employment has gone up by 6,400. The BLS payroll survey also showed an increase of 4,200 jobs since June 2016.

“The data shows a labor market that is steady but without much growth, which is the reason the WEI grew at a modest 1.1 percent rate during the second quarter,” White said.

Editorial: Out with the old, in with the new?

Last Wednesday, the Worcester Planning Board gave its approval to Roseland Residential Trust’s plan to build 84 units of housing on the site of Notre Dame des Canadiens Church. This brings Worcester one step closer to the demolition of the Salem Square landmark.

The previous day, Worcester Magazine reported that Mayor Joseph M. Petty will ask the City Council to “support in principle the relocation of the Red Sox Triple-A baseball team to Worcester including building a stadium to accommodate this team and further, request the City Manager do all that is reasonably in his power to facilitate this move.”

It would certainly be convenient to view these developments independently. In this way, we would not see the similarities and differences that tell a lot about the priorities of the city’s leaders and what they seem to believe residents want.

Editorial: A week’s worth of fireworks in Worcester

Worcester just enjoyed a week of dazzlers — and that’s not even counting Friday’s Independence Day fireworks display.

The succession of positive news flashes runs the gamut, and in some cases calls for patience or for optimism tempered by caution. But in the glow of a holiday stretch and with summer just getting started, we might as well sit back and enjoy it.

In terms of practicality and overall impact, the Central Building at 332 Main St. may be the biggest cause for celebration in Worcester’s good-news week.

Until a couple of years ago, the former office building had been on the demolition list. On Wednesday, the state announced that it will help redevelop it for housing. Of 55 apartments planned, 14 will be “workforce housing,” meaning they will go to people who have jobs but still can’t afford market-rate rents.

Inbox [July 2-8]: News and notes from Zipcar, South High, Armory Business Center, Worcester Public Library, WPS, POW! WOW! Worcester

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

Zipcar launches in Worcester

Zipcar, the world’s leading car-sharing network, announced a partnership with the city of Worcester to bring its “wheels when you want them” membership service to area residents, businesses, visitors and students.

Six Zipcars are available for reservation by the hour or by the day in easily accessible locations downtown. The vehicles are parked in designated spots for convenient pickup and drop-off and can be reserved on Zipcar’s mobile app, online or over the phone.

The Zipcar Worcester fleet features a variety of makes and models. Each reservation includes gas, insurance and 180 miles of driving per day.

“We’re excited to bring Zipcar to Worcester as part of the city’s growing transportation network,” said Chris Moulding, Zipcar regional community marketing manager.

Last week’s most popular, June 18-24

Here are the most popular Worcester Sun articles June 18-24

Nothing usual about The Chameleon opening on Shrewsbury Street
Mariano: Thought police take over the Citizen Advisory Council
Editorial: Leadership fails test over candidate’s Turtleboy tie
Worcester 2.0: An outsider’s inside look at the city’s developing future
For George’s Bakery, bread is where the heart is
No child’s play: Simon Says Give Worcester chapter packs a serious charitable punch