Lukes: Allies and endorsements, checks and balances

In this election, more than ever, character, experience, promises and enthusiasm are not the only criteria  to judge the worthiness of a candidate. A candidate’s alliances must also be considered, either as an advantage or a handicap.

Inbox [Oct. 4]: News and notes from National Grid, Holy Name and WPI, Sen. Chandler, Research Bureau, AdCare, Anna Maria, UniBank

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

Energy storage product to debut at Holy Name tomorrow

Tomorrow, National Grid and Vionx Energy will introduce a premier energy storage project developed in partnership with Holy Name Central Catholic Junior/Senior High School and WPI.

The project will demonstrate a multi-hour, battery-based energy storage system that will capture and store for later use the power generated by the 600 kW wind turbine located at Holy Name.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. will join Bishop Robert J. McManus, Mass. Dept. of Energy Resources Commissioner Judith Judson, state and local elected officials and representatives of National Grid, Vionx, WPI and Holy Name during a ceremony at 10 a.m. at Holy Name, 144 Granite St.

Editorial: In Worcester, help instead of handcuffs for drug buyers

It’s a thought a lot of us have had about the heartache of opioid abuse: People caught buying narcotics on the street need to be rescued, not arrested.

Many of those wrestling with addiction realize it, too, somewhere under the monster of their problem. And increasingly across the country, officials are thinking the same thing, that opioid addicts need help.

Massachusetts has chosen Worcester to lead the way in putting this powerful thought into practice.

Launched Thursday at Worcester Police headquarters, a pilot program funded with a $99,000 state grant is designed to steer opioid users into treatment instead of court dates, fines, possible jail and the continued grip of addiction. The Buyer Diversion Treatment Program will give some people caught buying illegal drugs the option of entering into arrest or detox.

Pastor Judith Hanlon

Inbox [Sept. 24-30]: News and notes from Worcester State, Becker, city, WPI, LGBT Asylum Task Force

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

Worcester State raises nearly $17M in Change Lives campaign

Worcester State University announced it has raised $16.9 million through the recently completed Change Lives Campaign, exceeding its $15 million goal.

WSU President Barry Maloney thanked donors for their support of scholarships, academic programs and transformational capital projects during a Gala of Gratitude celebration last night [Saturday, Sept. 23] in the school’s recently opened Wellness Center.

More than 7,000 donors contributed to the success of this five-year campaign, which is the third and largest in the Worcester State Foundation’s history.

Mariano: Petty vs. Gaffney, Round 2

In many municipal elections, candidates have to work hard to show the distinctions between them. Often the differences are a matter of degree – candidates agree more or less on what needs to be done. Not in this one.

Mayor Petty answers Ray Mariano’s questions

Twenty-two questions, 22 unedited answers. Find out what the current mayor told the former mayor about the safety of Worcester, the dual tax rate, #WooSox, and the greatest weaknesses of Augustus and Binienda.

Editorial: Oohs and aahs for ofo

Oof, those seven hills!

Other than that, ofo’s arrival in Worcester signals a city coasting smoothly forward.

On Thursday, the Beijing-based company launched its bike-sharing program in a ceremony at City Hall, capping months of preparing and research helped by local leaders and scholars. The stars of the cheerful kickoff were dozens of bright-yellow ofo bikes, ready to get going under the guidance of anyone over the age of 18 with a smartphone, a dollar and an hour.

A little ofo 101 is in order. Don’t be fooled: These substantial, simply styled bicycles may look old-fashioned, but they’re as high-tech as they come.

David Barsamian

Inbox [Sept. 17-23]: News and notes from Worcester State, Becker, Anna Maria, Friends of Goddard Library, GWCF and Library Foundation

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

David Barsamian to speak at WSU Tuesday

Broadcaster, author and award-winning investigative journalist David Barsamian will be the first speaker featured in Worcester State University’s new Provost’s Series on Democracy and Diplomacy.

Barsamian will deliver two talks. The first is a campus lecture, “The New Political Resistance in the Age of Trump,” at 10 a.m. Tuesday in the May Street Building, 280 May St.; the second, a community lecture, “Media, Propaganda, and U.S. Foreign Policy,” at 7 p.m. Ghosh Science and Technology Center, Room 102, 486 Chandler St.

Editorial: What’s next for North Main Street?

The revitalization of downtown as a retail center and destination has been dealt a double dose of disheartening disclosures in the past week.

The first was the announcements that Shack’s, the iconic clothier at Main and Mechanic streets, will close its doors for the final time on Sept. 30.

The second was that its bookend on North Main Street, Elwood Adams Hardware, 156 Main St., will also close as early as the end of September.

It is too soon to tell whether these closing are harbingers of more bad news or simply unrelated events. However, the history of the businesses that are closing — Shack’s has been in business 89 years and Elwood Adams opened in 1782 — should give us pause.