Worcester Weekly: stART on the Street, Clustertruck + more, Sept. 17-23

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too.

Sunday, Sept. 17 — stART on the Street, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Park Avenue, between Highland and Pleasant streets  If you’re going to bring gridlock to the heart of the city, you might as well do it with hundreds of talented artists, crafters and performers, and a list of activities longer than the backup on Chandler Street. That’s the great thing about stART on the Street — with so many cool things to see and do, for once nobody’s worried about the traffic.

UniBank scholarships

Inbox [July 16-22]: News and notes from Davis Art Gallery, UniBank, Worcester Institute for Senior Education, Columbus Day Parade, GWCF and SmartAsset

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

Davis Art Gallery seeking submissions for next exhibit

The Davis Art Gallery is seeking abstract artwork for our next juried exhibit: Nonobjective NOW. Various 2D and 3D media will be selected for the exhibit, including drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, mixed media, photography, fiber arts and more.

The gallery will select approximately 35 to 45 artworks that will appear in the main exhibition space at the gallery, 44 Portland St., from Sept. 22 to Jan. 5. An opening reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 22.

Last week’s most popular, April 9-15

Here are the most popular Worcester Sun articles April 9-15

Mariano: Have we learned anything from the closing of Our Lady of Mount Carmel? Are you ready for some lacrosse? Read this and you will be
Evan Corrigan: Diary of a visit to Worcester … England, that is
Editorial: Want to make Worcester a better place? Step up by stepping out
Sun Spots with Hitch [Vol. 152]: The continuing saga of the Midtown Mall

 

Gardens and gargoyles: Dilapidated churches grow into urban farms

Wondering what the future could hold for one of the city’s most beloved church buildings? Find out with author BJ Hill in the Sun’s serial glimpse into the fantastic (and mostly fictional) possibilities of a not-so distant tomorrow.

WORCESTER, June 9, 2019 – Within the city of Worcester there are 12 former church buildings that are facing the wrecking ball. Three of these buildings date back to the 1880s. They are cherished, sacred spaces where generations of parishioners married, baptized children, and said their goodbyes to loved ones. But in the last few decades, congregations of every faith have thinned out. While a giant extravagant property was once a symbol of reverence and success for a parish, now it’s become maintenance headaches for cash-strapped finance committees.

Some congregations sought to let go of the buildings, but developers know it’s daunting to repurpose thick cement walls, redesign a cavernous interior, and maintain the cultural and historical legacy.

Some church buildings were sold to the highest bidder, anyway, to await uncertain futures. With uninterested new owners and a minimum of maintenance, the once-mighty cornerstones of communities now decay and molder until they’re no longer safe to keep standing.

But a local company called Altar2Table is on a preservation campaign to purchase the properties and fix them up for what once would have been considered a most unlikely use: urban farms.

Can’t get enough? Find more What if … Worcester here

Altar2Table’s first purchase was Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church on Mulberry Street, which was officially closed by the Diocese of Worcester in 2016. After a year of renovations, the farm commenced operations in January 2019 and yielded its first harvest in April.