Seven Hills

Inbox [Oct. 8-14]: News and notes from Seven Hills and Children’s Friend, UniBank, Assumption, city and UMass Medical, Becker, QCC, Anna Maria

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

Children’s Friend affiliates with Seven Hills Foundation

Worcester-based Children’s Friend recently became an affiliate of Seven Hills Foundation. Children’s Friend provides high-level professional mental health services, adoption and related services, grief support, and early education and care for approximately 1,000 infants, toddlers and preschool children throughout Central Mass.

“Children’s Friend will continue to serve the Central Mass. community as it has for decades; offering care and comfort to children, adolescents and families,” said Dr. David Jordan, President of Seven Hills Foundation. “Children’s Friend has for many years served as the beacon for children’s programs and services. The partnership we now share together will only further that.”

Seven Hills Foundation offers program sites at 170 locations throughout Massachusetts and Rhode Island and employs nearly 3,800. It offers a continuum of support and services to 28,000 children, adults and seniors with disabilities and other life challenges through its 12 affiliate organizations.

Worcester Weekly: AbilityFest, Holy Cross football + more, Oct. 1-7

The most fun you’ll have with a calendar of events all week. And you just might learn something, too.

Sunday, Oct. 1 — AbilityFest 2017, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Institute Park, Salisbury Street, between Park and Humboldt Avenues  For more than six decades, the Seven Hills Foundation has helped people from all walks of life “See, Believe and Achieve,” no matter their myriad challenges. And for the third year running, they will highlight that message with a 5K road race and the Murphy Mile Walk (registration is closed).

Wikimedia Commons

Institute Park is set to host the third annual Seven Hills Foundation AbilityFest.

What you’ll be going for are the family-fun activities, exhibitors, vendors and live music from Worcester’s own My Silent Bravery — and to support the tremendous work of Seven Hills and the remarkable achievements of the folks they support. Free and open to the public.

Inbox [Sept. 10-16]: News and notes from Worcester Arts Council, Worcester Fire Fighters Local 1009, Clark, Assumption and Seven Hills Foundation

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

[Editor’s note: This roundup contains a political endorsement from an advocacy group. The Worcester Sun sharing these publicly available statements in no way constitutes an endorsement on our part of the corresponding organization’s choices or opinions.]

Worcester Arts Council accepting grant applications

The Worcester Arts Council is accepting grant applications for its 2018 funding cycle. The deadline for all grant applications is Oct. 16.

Based on community input received during 2017, WAC will give preference to community projects in the following categories: Public Art (murals, monuments, street art, etc.); Children’s Programs; and Visual Art (ceramics, drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography and video), However, all projects within the realm of arts, sciences and humanities will be considered. WAC will accept grant applications from the following: individuals, nonprofit organizations, associations that can establish a nonprofit objective, schools, libraries and other public agencies.

WAC will be offering two types of competitive grants in 2018: Project Grants and Fellowship Grants.

Inbox [March 5]: Becker panel to talk refugees and immigration, Assumption adds addiction counseling certificate, MassDiGI Game Challenge a hit, Bravehearts sign six

Interesting and worthwhile things happen every day in our community. Alas, we can’t cover them all. That’s where Inbox comes in, to offer readers an easily digestible compilation of interesting and noteworthy items you and your neighbors keep telling us about.

Panel discussion on refugees and immigration Monday at Becker

What are the practical implications of the Trump administration’s immigration measures? What impact do foreign-born workers have on the economy at the local, regional and national levels?

Deborah Becker

Courtesy WBUR

WBUR-FM (90.9) senior correspondent Deborah Becker

WBUR-FM (90.9) senior correspondent Deborah Becker will moderate a panel of community leaders who span higher education, international relations, health care and refugee assistance. The event is 6:30-8 p.m. Monday, March 6, in room 210 of the Weller Academic Center, 61 Sever St. on the Worcester campus of Becker College.

The panelists are scheduled to be Becker College President Robert E. Johnson; David Jordan, president and CEO of Seven Hills Foundation and professor of practice in social innovation at the Yunus Social Business Centre at Becker College; Dr. Olga Valdman, family medicine physician at Family Health Center and assistant professor at UMass Medical School; and Meredith Walsh, executive director and co-founder of the Worcester Refugee Assistance Project.

This event is presented by the Becker College Center for Global Citizenship.

Read the entire story on the Becker College website

Assumption announces grad certificate in addiction counseling

Assumption College has announced that beginning in fall 2017 it will offer a new Certificate in Graduate Studies in Addiction Counseling, which aims to raise the standard for the educational preparation of addiction counselors. The new certificate program is a one-year, six-course curriculum that consists of four content courses and two addiction counseling internships.

Worcester Weekly: Restaurant Week, Assumption hoops + more, as February turns to March

Sunday, Feb. 26 — Assumption women’s basketball vs. Le Moyne, NE-10 Conference quarterfinal, 3 p.m., Laska Gymnasium, Assumption College, 500 Salisbury St.  Basketball is kind of a big deal at Assumption, and recently it’s been the ladies taking the lead. Back in the conference tournament with a 19-7 record, the Greyhounds are poised to make a run behind a strong senior triumvirate — forward Jo Impellizeri and guards Allison Stoddard and Kelly Carey — and one of the stingiest defenses in all the land. Except, the last time these two teams met, the Dolphins came away with an ugly 48-42 victory.

Then again, this isn’t the first rodeo for coach Kerry Phayre, who’s wrapping up her 10th straight winning campaign and would no doubt like to stretch her 21st season at the Greyhound helm a few more games.

The unbelievably true story of Augustine Kanjia continues … Part 32: To Be a Man is Not Easy

My days were quite full. Not only with my new job and keeping my family fed, but with a challenging course schedule at Quinsigamond Community College.

Augustine Kanjia

I had loads of reading to do, piles of written homework, research and mathematics problems to grapple. It was a struggle, but I’d begun by loving school, and I felt the pinch of learning in a corner of my heart. “When you complete your education,” I thought, “you will be respected at home and abroad. In fact, you would get better pay and be on top of things. Why not just pretend as if your grandmother stands by you right now, urging you with a cane to go to school. Think how she wanted you [to become] the most educated at home.”

It seemed sometimes as if I were in a trance. Until I inevitably awoke to reality and realized I had more work to do. I needed to apply more effort. And I needed to not be distracted by what some of our Sierra Leonean friends were thinking and saying about me when they met.

I needed courage, but even Theresa had doubts. I could feel my wife saying, “Now that you are in college with these girls, I know you will fall in love with them.” My main worry was never the girls, but to achieve quickly, stop going to school and get a better job.

People worry about me more than I do for myself.

Augustine’s last chapter: Job offer sends me back to school Or scroll down to catch up from earlier in the remarkable tale

The unbelievably true story of Augustine Kanjia continues … Part 31: Job Offer Sends Me Back to School

Life was hard as our rent and bills piled up.

Augustine Kanjia

Our food stamps and financial support were reduced. I worked and worked but rarely saw the money. My wife, Theresa, took control of the little salary coming in. She suspected I was too generous and might want to send help to the many people we knew in Africa, even while we suffered.

I thought of my friend David Jordan, president of Seven Hills Foundation. He was the man who had promised me a job, and my wife too, if we had our driver’s licenses. I did not know the nature of the job, but I knew I wanted it.

Getting the license was a big deal. I was prepared for the driving test. Affording it was another question. I fought hard and sent messages to friends who had lived in America for a longer time. Two of them sent me a total of $300. That was enough for the road test, so I went.

I made a mistake by touching the yellow line right by the RMV. The examiner said I had failed the test. I could not object, and in 10 minutes I was dropped at home, quite sad and thinking the examiner was out to get me. But I soon scheduled another test, this time at Central Mass. Safety Council in West Boylston. I went with the examiner for more than 20 minutes. He kept giving me questions on signs; I made a three-point turn; and parallel parked.

I passed with ease. I was given the license. My whole house rejoiced as though I had just found a big diamond.

Augustine’s last chapter: New Year, Tough Beginning Or scroll down to catch up from earlier in the remarkable tale