July 5, 2017

Inbox [July 5]: News and notes from Webster Five, Citi Foundation, Worcester Public Schools, Price Rite and commonwealth of Mass.

Print More
Webster Five

Courtesy Webster Five

From left, Sam Bitar, executive director of the Webster Five Foundation & VP Business Systems Manager, Webster Five; Jonathan Mannina, executive director, Community Legal Aid; and Don Doyle, president and CEO, Webster Five.

Have news you or your group would like to share? Let us know by emailing it to info@worcester.ma. Be sure to include a link to the full release on your site or Facebook page so we can include it and send Sun members your way.

Webster Five donates $5K to Community Legal Aid

The Webster Five Foundation announced that as part of the Web of Caring to Make a Difference program, it will donate $5,000 to Community Legal Aid Inc. The money will help pay for the organization’s interpretation and translation expenses in Worcester County.

Community Legal Aid (CLA) is the civil legal aid program serving low-income and elderly residents of Worcester, Hampden, Hampshire, Franklin and Berkshire counties. Its mission is to improve people’s lives through legal assistance that protects fundamental rights, secures access to basic needs, and challenges policies and practices that harm its clients.

Donald F. Doyle, president and chief executive officer of Webster Five said, “It’s important that all people can receive high-quality legal assistance, regardless of their primary language. Webster Five is proud to support Community Legal Aid’s Language Access Project.”

CLA executive director Jonathan Mannina said, “We are grateful for Webster Five’s support. This allows us to better serve all of our clients.”

Worcester man named Citi Foundation Entrepreneurship Fellow

Khaled Khalifa of Worcester has been named a 2017 Citi Foundation Entrepreneurship Fellow, a summer leadership development and internship program for Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE) alumni, selected through a competitive application process.

Khaled Khalifa

Khalifa, a student at Clark University, will participate in NFTE BizCamp in New England. He is an alum of the Washington, D.C., NFTE program that started his business, Delicious New-York, at the age of 14.

Over the past few years, he has been working as the senior project coordinator for Clark’s Innovation and Entrepreneurship Department. He is majoring in Political Science and Economics and will graduate in December.

WPS Camp Invention begins Monday

Clark Street School and Woodland Academy will host Camp Invention for Worcester Public School students entering grades 3 through 6.

The camp runs Monday, July 10, through Friday, July 21. Hours at the Woodland Academy camp are 8 a.m.-noon; Clark Street School, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Parents may pre-register their children before tomorrow [July 6] 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Durkin Administration Building, 20 Irving St., Room 103, Office for Instruction and School Leadership.

This camp is through the National Inventors Hall of Fame and is possible through a generous grant from AbbVie. Children are presented with fun, hands-on challenges that encourage creative problem solving, teamwork, entrepreneurship, and innovation.

Price Rite introduces Wholesome Pantry line of free-form and organic products

Price Rite Supermarkets, which has locations at 117 Gold Star Blvd. and 520 Southbridge St., announced the addition of Wholesome Pantry, a new private-label line of free-from products, including a variety of USDA-certified organic products.

The Wholesome Pantry line includes organic foods that comply with standards set by the USDA National Organic Program.

“With the introduction of Wholesome Pantry to our stores, we are able to give shoppers accessible, convenient products that they can feel good about giving to their families, without breaking the bank,” said Neil Duffy, president of Price Rite.

Worcester, 10 other Central Mass. communities, earn IT grants

Worcester was one of 11 Central Mass. cities and towns to be awarded state Community Compact IT Grants.

Worcester was given $57,810 to deploy a performance management system that will act as a repository for city data, improve transparency and open opportunities for data-driven decision-making.

Grants of up to $200,000 support the implementation of innovative IT projects by funding related one-time capital needs such as technology infrastructure, upgrades and/or purchases of equipment or software.

The other Central Mass. grants:

  • Auburn, $28,000, to implement a modern permitting system for building and health departments, reducing the amount of time it takes employees to manage permits currently and allowing the public to apply for and track the status of permits online.
  • Douglas, $30,313, to upgrade existing IT infrastructure from Category 3 to Category 6 wiring to allow the town to make full use of their existing technology, provide for anticipated IT investments, and operate more efficiently.
  • Fitchburg, $60,000, to implement technology that will allow the police department to digitize paper reports thus improving the department’s internal processes and responses for requests for older reports. Furthermore, scanning decades of paper reports to an electronic format.
  • Grafton, $29,763, to implement a modern permitting system for all town departments, reducing the amount of time it takes employees to manage permits currently and allowing the public to apply for and track the status of permits online.
  • Leominster, $63,000, to enhance virtual server infrastructure at City Hall.
  • Lunenburg, $40,000, to implement a modern permitting system, reducing the amount of time it takes employees to manage permits currently and allowing the public to apply for and track the status of permits online.
  • Millbury, $20,000, to Implement a modern permitting system for all town departments, reducing the amount of time it takes employees to manage permits currently and allowing the public to apply for and track the status of permits online.
  • Oxford, $35,000, to build, setup, and deploy a new robust modern virtual server infrastructure l to replace the physical server technology that has reached capacity.
  • Paxton, $13,000, to consolidate townwide networks with domain server technology.  This will allow a more secure, agile network environment.
  • Southbridge, $45,000, to enhance school network and security infrastructure.

Read the entire story on the Commonwealth of Massachusetts website

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *