Mariano: Ideas worth considering for Worcester

“It is important that city officials focus on the day-to-day operation of our city departments – on routine services, both big and small, that we receive. Many departments do a good job, but all of them can do better. Here are a few ideas worth considering.”

State Rep. Kate Campanale talks Trump, Dixon, guns and making things happen

“I’m Kate Campanale, and I’m a Republican, and this is what I’ve done, and this is how I’ve represented my district. It’s made it difficult for people to see beyond the ‘R’ when all they’re getting is the national news. And that can be a little troubling for some Republicans, especially in Mass.”

A Mother’s Journey: The gentrification exasperation

“If Worcester can stop trying to be like everyone else for one second, it can make a difference in the lives of many small-business owners and residents. It can prevent the negative effects of gentrification and it can make Worcester the next vibrant destination for potential residents, developers and startups.”

Editorial: Policing the use of military gear

It’s important for police and citizens to see each other as being on the same side. Worcester’s department continues to put in the hard work in that direction. President Trump’s easing of Obama-era restrictions on acquisitions of military equipment is unlikely to have much, if any, effect locally. But it is cause for reflection nevertheless.

State Rep. Kate Campanale talks Trump, Dixon, guns and making things happen

“I’m Kate Campanale, and I’m a Republican, and this is what I’ve done, and this is how I’ve represented my district. It’s made it difficult for people to see beyond the ‘R’ when all they’re getting is the national news. And that can be a little troubling for some Republicans, especially in Mass.”

A visionary Worcester under fire

While Worcester experiences “unprecedented investment” in downtown development especially, the great influx of cash from outside economic forces neglects, in one advocate’s mind, a broader image of community and risks far more than the city would stand to gain from using the determined, blue-collar progress of Main South as a blueprint for a vibrant, inclusive and sustainable future.

Last week’s most popular, April 2-8

Here are the most popular Worcester Sun articles April 2-8

Area artist molds a new career, city narrative with Mugged in Worcester [April 2]
Mariano: The man nobody wants but every neighborhood needs [April 2]
Worcester teachers union wins PCB battle, will begin testing at Burncoat and Doherty [March 31]
Sina-cism: ‘Coming Apart,’ at Middlebury and elsewhere [April 2]
State’s highest court hears arguments for and against ICE immigration detainers [April 5]

Billy Breault

Mariano: The man nobody wants but every neighborhood needs

“He is loud and brash. His hair is long and unruly, and he wears a giant mustache that looks like a battering ram. … When he gets angry, and that is often, he looks like someone you want to avoid. Detractors call him a loudmouth, a bully and much worse.” In the first of a new series, Ray Mariano profiles Billy Breault, the Marshal of Main South.